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  1. Prize, Not Price: Reframing Rewards for Kidney Donors.Aksel Braanen Sterri - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):57-57.
    Worldwide 1.2 million people are dying from kidney failure each year, and in the USA alone, approximately 100 000 people are currently on the waiting list for a kidney transplant. One possible solution to the kidney shortage is for governments to pay donors for one of their healthy kidneys and distribute these kidneys according to need. There are, however, compelling objections to this government-monopsony model. To avoid these objections, I propose a small adjustment to the model. I suggest we reward (...)
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  • The Significance of Relatedness in Healthcare.Henk ten Have & Bert Gordijn - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (2):169-170.
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  • Dual Consent? Donors’ and Recipients’ Views About Involvement in Decision-Making on the Use of Embryos Created by Gamete Donation in Research.I. Baía, C. de Freitas, C. Samorinha, V. Provoost & S. Silva - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):1-6.
    Background Reasonable disagreement about the role awarded to gamete donors in decision-making on the use of embryos created by gamete donation for research purposes emphasises the importance of considering the implementation of participatory, adaptive, and trustworthy policies and guidelines for consent procedures. However, the perspectives of gamete donors and recipients about decision-making regarding research with EGDs are still under-researched, which precludes the development of policies and guidelines informed by evidence. This study seeks to explore the views of donors and recipients (...)
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  • A Phenomenological Approach to the Ethics of Transplantation Medicine: Sociality and Sharing When Living-with and Dying-with Others.Kristin Zeiler - 2014 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (5):369-388.
    Recent years have seen a rise in the number of sociological, anthropological, and ethnological works on the gift metaphor in organ donation contexts, as well as in the number of philosophical and theological analyses of giving and generosity, which has been mirrored in the ethical debate on organ donation. In order to capture the breadth of this field, four frameworks for thinking about bodily exchanges in medicine have been distinguished: property rights, heroic gift-giving, sacrifice, and gift-giving as aporia. Unfortunately, they (...)
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  • Responsible Research with Human Tissues: The Need for Reciprocity Toward Both Collectives and Individuals.Annelien L. Bredenoord, Johannes J. M. van Delden, Sarah N. Boers, Karin R. Jongsma & Michael A. Lensink - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (4):75-78.
    Precision medicine research involving human biological material is becoming an increasingly central component of healthcare, and its potential is quickly growing due to rapid technological progress...
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  • Ka Mura Ka Muri: Understandings of Organ Donation and Transplantation in Aotearoa New Zealand.Rhonda Shaw & Robert Webb - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2020-012038.
    In this article, we refer to the separation of solid organs from the body as bio-objects. We suggest that the transfer of these bio-objects is connected to emotions and affects that carry a range of different social and cultural meanings specific to the context of Aotearoa New Zealand. The discussion draws on research findings from a series of qualitative indepth interview studies conducted from 2008 to 2013 with Māori and Pākehā concerning their views on organ donation and transplantation. Our findings (...)
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  • We Have “Gifted” Enough: Indigenous Genomic Data Sovereignty in Precision Medicine.Janis Geary, Jessica A. Kolopenuk, Joseph M. Yracheta & Krystal S. Tsosie - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (4):72-75.
    In “Obligations of the ‘Gift’: Reciprocity and Responsibility in Precision Medicine,” Lee rightly points out that disparities in health care access also lead to disparities in precision medi...
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  • Do Solidarity and Reciprocity Obligations Compel African Researchers to Feedback Individual Genetic Results in Genomics Research?Dimpho Ralefala, Mary Kasule, Ambroise Wonkam, Mogomotsi Matshaba & Jantina de Vries - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-11.
    BackgroundA key ethical question in genomics research relates to whether individual genetic research results should be disclosed to research participants and if so, which results are to be disclosed, by whom and when. Whilst this issue has received only scarce attention in African bioethics discourse, the extension of genomics research to the African continent has brought it into sharp focus.MethodsIn this qualitative study, we examined the views of adolescents, parents and caregivers participating in a paediatric and adolescent HIV-TB genomic study (...)
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  • The “We” in the “Me”: Solidarity and Health Care in the Era of Personalized Medicine.Barbara Prainsack - 2018 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 43 (1):21-44.
    This article challenges a key tacit assumption underpinning legal and ethical instruments in health care, namely, that people are ideally bounded, independent, and often also strategically rational individuals. Such an understanding of personhood has been criticized within feminist and other critical scholarship as being unfit to capture the deeply relational nature of human beings. In the field of medicine, however, it also causes tangible problems. I propose that a solidarity-based perspective entails a relational approach and as such helps to formulate (...)
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  • Organoids as Hybrids: Ethical Implications for the Exchange of Human Tissues.Sarah N. Boers, Johannes J. M. van Delden & Annelien L. Bredenoord - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (2):131-139.
    Recent developments in biotechnology allow for the generation of increasingly complex products out of human tissues, for example, human stem cell lines, synthetic embryo-like structures and organoids. These developments are coupled with growing commercial interests. Although commercialisation can spark the scientific and clinical promises, profit-making out of human tissues is ethically contentious and known to raise public concern. The traditional bioethical frames of gift versus market are inapt to capture the resulting practical and ethical complexities. Therefore, we propose an alternative (...)
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