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  1. Towards a Feminist Aesthetics of Melancholia: Kristeva, Adorno, and Modern Women Writers.Ewa Ziarek - 2010 - Critical Horizons 11 (3):443 - 461.
    Melancholia is a hybrid concept, deployed in feminist and philosophical theories politics and aesthetics, but ‘properly” belonging to neither. This heterogeneity of melancholia as both an aesthetic and a political category allows us to interrogate the interrelationship between gender politics and aesthetics without, however, abolishing their differences. Reinterpreted in the context of a feminist aesthetics, melancholia not only points to art’s origin in the unjust and gendered division of labor and power but also to the ethical and political task of (...)
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  • ‘The Zone of the Carcass and the Knacker'-On Adorno's Concern with the Suffering Body.Mathijs Peters - 2015 - European Journal of Philosophy 23 (4):1238-1258.
    Adorno's moral philosophy is famously problematic. One of the main reasons for this is that it revolves around the moral addendum: a physical impulse of solidarity with suffering beings that, he argues, cannot and should not be rationalized. I show that, since this moral addendum remains vague and since Adorno's radical negativity forces him to dismiss as uncritical all other approaches to morality, he deliberately places his thought in danger of relapsing into irrationality. Most commentators therefore disagree about the manner (...)
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  • Body, Mimesis and Childhood in Adorno, Kafka and Freud.Matt F. Connell - 1998 - Body and Society 4 (4):67-90.
    The viscerally Freudian elements of Adorno's use of the concept of mimesis interweave with readings of Kafka in which certain thoughts about childhood play an important role. The first section of this article links biological mimicry with critical theory and art: both mimic what they criticize, while also conserving a repressed and childlike mimetic relationship with otherness and sexual difference. Adorno criticizes both the civilized repression of the mimetic impulse and its subsequently distorted return, a dialectic neglected by direct appeals (...)
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  • Unfinished Business: Toward a Reformational Conception of Truth.Lambert Zuidervaart - 2009 - Philosophia Reformata 74 (1):1-20.
    This essay presents an emerging conception of truth and shows how it appropriates Herman Dooyeweerd’s conception. First I compare my “critical hermeneutics” with other reformational models of critique. Then I propose to think of truth as a dynamic correlation between human fidelity to societal principles and a life-giving disclosure of society. This conception recontextualizes the notion of propositional truth, and it links questions of intersubjective validity with Dooyeweerd’s emphasis on “standing in the truth.” While abandoning his idea of transcendent truth, (...)
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  • After Adorno: Art, Autonomy, and Critique.John Roberts - 2000 - Historical Materialism 7 (1):221-239.
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  • Theodor W. Adorno.L. Zuidevaart - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • Theodor W. Adorno.Lambert Zuidervaart - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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