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Introduction

In Hans-Christoph Schmidt am Busch (ed.), The Philosophy of Recognition: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives. Lanham MD: Lexington Books. pp. 1-19 (2010)

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  1. Beyond Redistribution: Honneth, Recognition Theory and Global Justice.Renante D. Pilapil - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (1):34-48.
    ABSTRACTThis paper attempts to explore the ways through which the discourse on global justice can be expanded beyond the language of redistribution by utilizing the insights from the theory of recognition as proposed by Honneth. It looks into the potential contributions of recognition theory in the normative analysis of global poverty and inequality. Taking off from the argument that the focus on global redistributive justice is misleading, the paper makes three claims: firstly, any global justice discourse must take as its (...)
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  • Comprehending Sociality: Hegel Beyond his Appropriation in Contemporary Philosophy of Recognition.Christian Krijnen - 2017 - Hegel Bulletin 38 (2):266-292.
    Contemporary philosophy of recognition represents probably the most prominent direction that presently claims to introduce an updated version of classical German idealism into ongoing debates, including the debate on the nature of sociality. In particular, studies of Axel Honneth offer triggering contributions in Frankfurt School fashion while at the same time rejuvenating Hegel’s philosophy in terms of a philosophy of recognition. According to Honneth, this attempt at a rejuvenation also involves substantial modification of Hegelian doctrines. It is shown that Honneth (...)
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  • Fostering the therapeutic alliance: Recognizing autonomy’s dialogical antecedents.Maurice Kinsella - 2019 - Philosophical Psychology 32 (3):332-356.
    This paper presents a reconceptualization of autonomy as the iterative realization of one’s capacity for “effective self-definition,” that is, possessing a sense of clarity and coherence in “who I am,” and exercising the decisional and volitional ownership over my life that this engenders. This process is “Relational,” wherein people’s interpersonal interactions have a deep and pervasive influence on their ability to recognize and exercise their autonomous capacities. This Relational understanding of autonomy is contextualized within the field of addiction rehabilitative practice. (...)
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