Review of the Evidence of Sentience in Cephalopod Molluscs and Decapod Crustaceans

Download Edit this record How to cite View on PhilPapers
Abstract
Sentience is the capacity to have feelings, such as feelings of pain, pleasure, hunger, thirst, warmth, joy, comfort and excitement. It is not simply the capacity to feel pain, but feelings of pain, distress or harm, broadly understood, have a special significance for animal welfare law. Drawing on over 300 scientific studies, we evaluate the evidence of sentience in two groups of invertebrate animals: the cephalopod molluscs or, for short, cephalopods (including octopods, squid and cuttlefish) and the decapod crustaceans or, for short, decapods (including crabs, lobsters and crayfish). We also evaluate the potential welfare implications of current commercial practices involving these animals.
Keywords
Categories
PhilPapers/Archive ID
BIRROT-5
Upload history
Archival date: 2021-11-22
View other versions
Added to PP index
2021-11-22

Total views
132 ( #40,169 of 64,228 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
132 ( #4,224 of 64,228 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads since first upload
This graph includes both downloads from PhilArchive and clicks on external links on PhilPapers.