Imaginative immersion, regulation, and doxastic mediation

Synthese 199 (3-4): 1-43 (2021)
Download Edit this record How to cite View on PhilPapers
Abstract
This paper puts forward an account of imaginative immersion. Elaborating on Kendall Walton’s thesis that imagining aims at the fictional truth, it first argues that imaginings are inherently rule- or norm-governed: they are ‘regulated’ by that which is presented as fictionally true. It then shows that an imaginer can follow the rule or norm mandating her to imagine the propositions presented as fictional truths either by acquiring explicit beliefs about how the rule (norm) is to be followed, or directly, without acquiring such beliefs. It proceeds to argue that to the extent that an imaginer follows this rule (norm) without holding such beliefs, she is more immersed in her imaginings. The general idea is that immersion in an activity is a matter of following rules or norms that apply to that activity without explicitly thinking about how to follow them, that is, without ‘doxastic mediation.’ Lastly, the paper shows that this thesis can explain various features associated with imaginative immersion, such as the sort of attentiveness it involves, the emotional response it generates, and its relation to spoilers.
ISBN(s)
PhilPapers/Archive ID
CHAIIR-2
Upload history
First archival date: 2021-01-22
Latest version: 2 (2021-01-24)
View other versions
Added to PP index
2021-01-22

Total views
280 ( #27,856 of 71,203 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
54 ( #14,773 of 71,203 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads since first upload
This graph includes both downloads from PhilArchive and clicks on external links on PhilPapers.