Methods of ethics and the descent of man: Darwin and Sidgwick on ethics and evolution

Biology and Philosophy 25 (3):361-378 (2010)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

Darwin’s treatment of morality in The Descent of Man has generated a wide variety of responses among moral philosophers. Among these is the dismissal of evolution as irrelevant to ethics by Darwin’s contemporary Henry Sidgwick; the last, and arguably the greatest, of the Nineteenth Century British Utilitarians. This paper offers a re-examination of Sidgwick’s response to evolutionary considerations as irrelevant to ethics and the absence of any engagement with Darwin’s work in Sidgwick’s main ethical treatise, The Methods of Ethics . This assessment of Sidgwick’s response to Darwin’s work is shown to have significance for a number of ongoing controversies in contemporary metaethics.

Author's Profile

Hallvard Lillehammer
Birkbeck College, University Of London

Analytics

Added to PP
2010-03-13

Downloads
618 (#12,653)

6 months
25 (#40,614)

Historical graph of downloads since first upload
This graph includes both downloads from PhilArchive and clicks on external links on PhilPapers.
How can I increase my downloads?