The Significance of Dehumanization: Nazi Ideology and its Psychological Consequences

Politics, Religion and Ideology 19 (2):139‒157 (2018)
Download Edit this record How to cite View on PhilPapers
Abstract
Several authors have recently questioned whether dehumanization is a psychological prerequisite of mass violence. This paper argues that the significance of dehumanization in the context of National Socialism can be understood only if its ideological dimension is taken into account. The author concentrates on Alfred Rosenberg’s racist doctrine and shows that Nazi ideology can be read as a political anthropology that grounds both the belief in the German privilege and the dehumanization of the Jews. This anthropological framework combines biological, cultural and metaphysical aspects. Therefore, it cannot be reduced to biologism. This new reading of Nazi ideology supports three general conclusions: First, the author reveals a complex strategy of dehumanization which is not considered in the current psychological debate. Second, the analysis of the ideological mechanism suggests a model of dehumanization that is more plausible than other psychological models. Third, the author provides evidence that this kind of dehumanization had psychological consequences and hence was an important feature of Nazi reality.
PhilPapers/Archive ID
STETSO-67
Revision history
Archival date: 2018-06-21
View upload history
References found in this work BETA
Paradoxes of Dehumanization.Smith, David Livingstone

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Added to PP index
2018-06-21

Total views
135 ( #22,564 of 43,016 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
80 ( #6,693 of 43,016 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads since first upload
This graph includes both downloads from PhilArchive and clicks to external links.