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  1. Survey Article: Philosophy and Public Policy After Piketty.Martin O'Neill - 2017 - Journal of Political Philosophy 25 (3):343-375.
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  • Justice in Finance: The Normative Case for an International Financial Transaction Tax.Gabriel Wollner - 2013 - Journal of Political Philosophy 22 (4):458-485.
    There has recently been much debate about the idea of levying a tax on particular transactions on international financial markets. Economists have argued about how much revenue such an international financial transaction tax would raise and they disagree about what effects it would have on trade volumes, financial stability, and overall growth. Politicians have argued about the feasibility of introducing such a tax internationally and they disagree on its adequacy as a policy response to the current financial and economic crisis. (...)
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  • Political Inequality and the 'Super-Rich': Their Money or (Some of) Their Political Rights.Dean J. Machin - 2013 - Res Publica 19 (2):121-139.
    The ability of very wealthy individuals (or, as I will call them, the ‘super-rich’) to turn their economic power into political power has been—and remains—an important cause of political inequality. In response, this paper advocates an original solution. Rather than solving the problem through implementing a comprehensive conception of political equality, or through enforcing complex rules about financial disclosure etc., I argue that we should impose a choice on the super-rich. The super-rich must choose between (i) forfeiting the things that (...)
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  • Tax Competition and Global Background Justice.Peter Dietsch & Thomas Rixen - 2014 - Journal of Political Philosophy 22 (2):150-177.
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  • A Moral and Economic Critique of the New Property-Owning Democrats: On Behalf of a Rawlsian Welfare State.Kevin Vallier - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (2):283-304.
    Property-owning democracies combine the regulative and redistributive functions of the welfare state with the governmental aim of ensuring that wealth and capital are widely dispersed. John Rawls, political philosophy’s most famous property-owning democrat, argued that property-owning democracy was one of two regime types that best realized his two principles of justice, though he was notoriously vague about how a property-owning democracy’s institutions are meant to realize his principles. To compensate for this deficiency, a number of Rawlsian political philosophers have tried (...)
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  • BEPS, Tax Sovereignty and Global Justice.Laurens van Apeldoorn - 2018 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 21 (4):478-499.
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  • Liberty, Equality and Property-Owning Democracy.Martin O'Neill - 2009 - Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (3):379-396.
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  • Principles of Economics.Alfred Marshall - 1891 - International Journal of Ethics 1 (4):505-507.
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  • Enslaving the Beachcomber: Some Thoughts on the Liberty Objections to Endowment Taxation.Kirk Stark - 2005 - Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 18 (1).
    Conventional wisdom among contemporary liberal egalitarians is that taxing individuals according to their “endowment” or “earnings capacity” would constitute an unacceptable intrusion on basic human liberties. In effect, the argument goes, such a scheme would result in a type of slavery – in order to pay the tax, people would be forced to accept jobs commensurate with their identified levels of endowment. The most succinct formulation of this argument comes from John Rawls, who argued that an endowment tax “would force (...)
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