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  1. Becoming Symbol-Minded.Judy S. DeLoache - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (2):66-70.
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  • A Common Structure for Concepts of Individuals, Stuffs, and Real Kinds: More Mama, More Milk, and More Mouse.Ruth Garrett Millikan - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):55-65.
    Concepts are highly theoretical entities. One cannot study them empirically without committing oneself to substantial preliminary assumptions. Among the competing theories of concepts and categorization developed by psychologists in the last thirty years, the implicit theoretical assumption that what falls under a concept is determined by description () has never been seriously challenged. I present a nondescriptionist theory of our most basic concepts, which include (1) stuffs (gold, milk), (2) real kinds (cat, chair), and (3) individuals (Mama, Bill Clinton, the (...)
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  • The Cluster Account of Art Defended.Berys Gaut - 2005 - British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (3):273-288.
    This paper replies to objections from Thomas Adajian, Stephen Davies, and Robert Stecker to my claim, defended in ‘"Art" as a Cluster Concept’, that ‘art’ is a cluster concept and so cannot be defined. The paper also clarifies and extends the arguments of the earlier paper and locates its position in relation to the work of Morris Weitz.
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  • Artworks as Artifacts.Jerrold Levinson - 2007 - In Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (eds.), Creations of the Mind: Theories of Artifacts and Their Representaion. Oxford University Press. pp. 74--82.
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  • Art and the Brain.Semir Zeki - 1999 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (6-7):6-7.
    The article defines the function of the visual brain as a search for constancies with the aim of obtaining knowledge about the world, and claims that it is applicable with equal vigour to the function of art. We define the general function of art as a search for the constant, lasting, essential, and enduring features of objects, surfaces, faces, situations, and so on, which allows us not only to acquire knowledge about the particular object, or face, or condition represented on (...)
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  • Intention, History, and Artifact Concepts.Paul Bloom - 1996 - Cognition 60 (1):1-29.
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  • What is a Work of Art?Harold Osborne - 1981 - British Journal of Aesthetics 21 (1):3-11.
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