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Biology and Theology in Malebranche's Theory of Organic Generation

In Ohad Nachtomy & Justin E. H. Smith (eds.), The Life Sciences in Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 137-156 (2014)

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  1. Metaphysics and the new science.Gary Hatfield - 1990 - In David C. Lindberg & Robert S. Westman (eds.), Reappraisals of the Scientific Revolution, ed. by and (Cambridge:). Cambridge University Press. pp. 93–166.
    An understanding of the relationship between metaphysics and natural philosophy - or, as we might now say, between philosophy and science - is fundamental to understanding the rise of the "new science" of the seventeenth century. Twentieth-century scholarship on this relationship has been dominated by the thoughbt of Ernst Cassirer, E. A. Burtt, A. N. Whitehead, and Alexandre Koyre. These authors found a common core in the mathematization of nature, which they ascribed to a common Platonic or Pythagorean metaphysical presupposition, (...)
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  • Rationalism and embryology: Caspar Friedrich Wolff's theory of epigenesis.Shirley A. Roe - 1979 - Journal of the History of Biology 12 (1):1-43.
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  • Science and Philosophy in Aristotle's "Generation of Animals".Anthony Preus - 1970 - Journal of the History of Biology 3 (1):1 - 52.
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  • Descartes' physiology and its relation to his psychology.Gary Hatfield - 1992 - In John Cottingham (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Descartes. Cambridge University Press. pp. 335--370.
    Descartes understood the subject matter of physics (or natural philosophy) to encompass the whole of nature, including living things. It therefore comprised not only nonvital phenomena, including those we would now denominate as physical, chemical, minerological, magnetic, and atmospheric; it also extended to the world of plants and animals, including the human animal (with the exception of those aspects of the human mind that Descartes assigned to solely to thinking substance: pure intellect and will). Descartes wrote extensively on physiology and (...)
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  • Malebranche et le préformisme biologique.Paul Schrecker - 1938 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 1 (1):77-96.
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