Switch to: Citations

References in:

The Roots of Despair

Res Philosophica 92 (4):829-854 (2015)

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Wandering in Darkness: Narrative and the Problem of Suffering.Eleonore Stump - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    Wandering in Darkness reconciles the existence of an omniscient, omnipotent, perfectly good God with suffering in the world. Eleanore Stump presents the moral psychology and value theory within which the theodicy of Thomas Aquinas is embedded. She explicates Aquinas's account of the good for human beings, including the nature of love and union among persons, and then argues that some philosophical problems are best considered in the context of narratives. In the context of famous biblical stories and against the backdrop (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   53 citations  
  • On Evil.Thomas Aquinas (ed.) - 2003 - Oup Usa.
    The De Malo represents some of Aquinas' most mature thinking on goodness, badness, and human agency. In it he examines the full range of questions associated with evil: its origin, its nature, its relation to good, and its compatability with the existence of an omnipotent, benevolent God. This edition offers Richard Regan's new, clear readable English translation, based on the Leonine Commission's authoritative edition of the Latin text. Brian Davies has provided an extensive introduction and notes..
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Aquinas’s Virtues of Acknowledged Dependence.Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung - 2004 - Faith and Philosophy 21 (2):214-227.
    This paper compares Aristotle’s and Aquinas’s accounts of the virtue of magnanimity specifically as a corrective to the vice of pusillanimity. After definingpusillanimity and underscoring key features of Aristotelian magnanimity, I explain how Aquinas’s account of Christian magnanimity, by making humandependence on God fundamental to this virtue, not only clarifies the differences between the vice of pusillanimity and the virtue of humility, but also showswhy only Christian magnanimity can free us from improper and damaging forms of dependence on the opinions (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Epistemological Crises, Dramatic Narrative and the Philosophy of Science.Alisdair MacIntyre - 1977 - The Monist 60 (4):453-472.
    What is an epistemological crisis? Consider, first, the situation of ordinary agents who are thrown into such crises. Someone who has believed that he was highly valued by his employers and colleagues is suddenly fired; someone proposed for membership of a club whose members were all, so he believed, close friends is blackballed. Or someone falls in love and needs to know what the loved one really feels; someone falls out of love and needs to know how he or she (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   61 citations  
  • Man's Search for Meaning.Viktor Frankl - 1985 - Beacon.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   112 citations  
  • Practicing Hope.Rebecca DeYoung - 2014 - Res Philosophica 91 (3):387-410.
    In this essay, I consider how the theological virtue of hope might be practiced. I will first explain Thomas Aquinas’s account of this virtue, including its structural relation to the passion of hope, its opposing vices, and its relationship to the friendship of charity. Then, using narrative and character analysis from the film The Shawshank Redemption, I examine a range of hopeful and proto-hopeful practices concerning both the goods one hopes for and the power one relies on to attain those (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Aquinas on the Vice of Sloth: Three Interpretive Issues.Rebecca DeYoung - 2011 - The Thomist 75 (1):43-64.
    Defining the capital vice of sloth (acedia) is a difficult business in Thomas Aquinas and in the Christian tradition of thought from which he draws his account. In this article, I will raise three problems for interpreting Aquinas's account of sloth. They are all related, as are the resolutions to them I will offer. The three problems can be framed as questions: How, on Aquinas's account, can sloth consistently be categorized as, first, a capital vice and, second, a spiritual vice? (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Confessions.R. S. Augustine & Pine-Coffin - 1979 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    Like the first Hackett edition of the Augustine's _Confessions_, the second edition features F. J. Sheed's remarkable translation of this classic spiritual autobiography with an Introduction by noted historian of late antiquity Peter Brown. New to this edition are a wealth of notes on literary, philosophical, biblical, historical, and liturgical topics by Michael P. Foley, an Editor's Preface, a map, a timeline, paragraph numbers in the text, a glossary, and a thorough index. The text itself has been completely reset, with (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   51 citations  
  • After Virtue: A Study in Moral Theory.Alasdair Macintyre - 1983 - Ethics 93 (3):579-587.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   107 citations  
  • The Sickness Unto Death.Søen Kierkegaard & Walter Lowrie - 1941 - Princeton University Press.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   95 citations  
  • Emotions.Peter King - 2011 - In Brian Davies & Eleonore Stump (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Aquinas. Oxford University Press.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation