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  1. Self-discovery.Jim I. Unah - 2011 - Cultura 8 (1):143-158.
    Self-discovery leads to the development of the ethics of self-mastery. Many ethical systems prescribe how the individual could attain self-mastery by means of critical self-examination or self-analysis. Once such critical self-examination or self-analysis is successfully carried out, the individual begins to use himself, his personal preferences, as the standard of what is right or wrong. This is the background to the Confucian, Kantian and Existentialist ethics of categorical imperatives. Even in religious ethical systems that attribute the source of the moral (...)
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  • Ubuntu and Buddhism in Higher Education: An Ontological (Re)Thinking.David W. Robinson-Morris - 2018 - New York: Routledge.
    Ubuntu and Buddhism in Higher Education theorizes the equal privileging of ontology and epistemology towards a balanced focus on 'being-becoming' and knowledge acquisition within the field of higher education. In response to the shift in higher education's aims and purposes beginning in the latter half of the 20th century, this book reconsiders higher education and Western subjectivity through southern African and Eastern onto-epistemologies. By mapping these other-than-West ontological viewpoints onto the discourse surrounding higher education, this volume presents a vision of (...)
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  • Rooted and rootless pluralist approaches to truth:Two distinct interpretations of Wang chong’s account.Bo Mou - unknown
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  • How the West Was One: The Western as Individualist, the African as Communitarian.Thaddeus Metz - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (11):1175-1184.
    There is a kernel of truth in the claim that Western, and especially Anglo-American-Australasian, normative philosophy, including that relating to the philosophy of education, is individualistic; it tends to prize properties that are internal to a human being such as her autonomy, rationality, pleasure, desires, self-esteem, self-realization and virtues relating to, say, her intellect. One notable exception is the idea that students ought to be educated in order to be citizens, participants in a democratic and cosmopolitan order, but, compared to (...)
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  • Harmonizing global ethics in the future: a proposal to add south and east to west.Thaddeus Metz - 2014 - Journal of Global Ethics 10 (2):146-155.
    This article considers how global ethical matters might be approached differently in the English-speaking literature if values salient in sub-Saharan Africa and East Asia were taken seriously. Specifically, after pointing out how indigenous values in both of these major parts of the world tend to prescribe honouring harmonious relationships, the article brings out what such an approach to morality entails for political power, foreign relations and criminal justice. For each major issue, it suggests that harmony likely has implications that differ (...)
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  • Values in China as Compared to Africa: Two Conceptions of Harmony.Thaddeus Metz - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):441-465.
    Given a 21st century context of sophisticated market economies and other Western influences such as Christianity, what similarities and differences are there between characteristic indigenous values of sub-Saharan Africa and China, and how do they continue to influence everyday life in these societies? Establishing that central to both non-Western, indigenous value systems are ideals of harmonious relationships, I compare and contrast traditional African and Chinese conceptions of harmony and analyze a number of respects in which an appeal to this value (...)
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  • Self-discovery: Who am I? An Ontologized Ethics of Self-mastery.Jim I. Unah - 2011 - Cultura 8 (1):143-158.
    Self-discovery leads to the development of the ethics of self-mastery. Many ethical systems prescribe how the individual could attain self-mastery by means of critical self-examination or self-analysis. Once such critical self-examination or self-analysis is successfully carried out, the individual begins to use himself, his personal preferences, as the standard of what is right or wrong. This is the background to the Confucian, Kantian and Existentialist ethics of categorical imperatives. Even in religious ethical systems that attribute the source of the moral (...)
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  • The Historical Development of the Written Discourses on Ubuntu 1.Cbn Gade - 2011 - South African Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):303-329.
    In this article, I demonstrate that the term ‘ ubuntu ’ has frequently appeared in writing since at least 1846. I also analyse changes in how ubuntu has been defined in written sources in the period 1846 to 2011. The analysis shows that in written sources published prior to 1950, it appears that ubuntu is always defined as a human quality. At different stages during the second half of the 1900s, some authors began to define ubuntu more broadly: definitions included (...)
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  • The Historical Development of the Written Discourses on Ubuntu.Christian Bn Gade - 2011 - South African Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):303-329.
    In this article, I demonstrate that the term ‘ubuntu’ has frequently appeared in writing since at least 1846. I also analyse changes in how ubuntu has been defined in written sources in the period 1846 to 2011. The analysis shows that in written sources published prior to 1950, it appears that ubuntu is always defined as a human quality. At different stages during the second half of the 1900s, some authors began to define ubuntu more broadly: definitions included ubuntu as (...)
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  • The rise of China and the time of Africa: Gauging Afro-Sino relations in the light of Confucian philosophy and African ideals.Cornel Du Toit - 2015 - HTS Theological Studies 71 (1).
    The article focuses on Sino-African relations, with specific reference to South Africa. An outline is provided of recent developments as a roadmap for the unfolding of this relationship. The question of whether China’s African interest can be seen as tacit colonisation is discussed. Even if these fears are allayed, the question remains whether the Chinese presence on the continent will make a significant difference to African development. To answer this question, the focus shifts to economic models and the Chinese recipe (...)
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  • Transforming the African philosophical place through conversations: An inquiry into the Global Expansion of Thought.Jonathan O. Chimakonam - 2015 - South African Journal of Philosophy 34 (4):462-479.
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  • Confucianism and ubuntu: Reflections on a dialogue between chinese and african traditions.Daniel A. Bell & Thaddeus Metz - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (s1):78-95.
    In this article we focus on three key precepts shared by Confucianism and the African ethic of Ubuntu: the central value of community, the desirability of ethical partiality, and the idea that we tend to become morally better as we grow older. For each of these broad similarities, there are key differences underlying them, and we discuss those as well as speculate about the reasons for them. Our aim is not to take sides, but we do suggest ways that Ubuntu (...)
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  • Confucian Harmony from an African Perspective.Thaddeus Metz - 2016 - African and Asian Studies 15 (1):1-22.
    Chenyang Li’s new book, The Philosophy of Confucian Harmony, has been heralded as the first book-length exposition of the concept of harmony in the approximately 3,000 year old Confucian tradition. It provides a systematic analysis of Confucian harmony and defence of its relevance for contemporary moral and political thought. In this philosophical discussion of Li’s book, I expound its central claims, contextualize them relative to other salient work in English-speaking Confucian thought, and critically reflect on them in light of a (...)
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  • Editor’s postscript: From the vantage point of constructive-engagement strategy of comparative philosophy.Bo Mou - 2015 - Comparative Philosophy 6 (2).
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  • Whole set of volume 1 no 1 (2010) of comparative philosophy.Bo Mou - 2010 - Comparative Philosophy 1 (1).
    Whole Set of Contents of Current Issue (for cross-reference reading and hard-copy preservation of the whole issue).
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