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  1. Alternate Possibilities and Moral Responsibility.Harry G. Frankfurt - 1969 - Journal of Philosophy 66 (23):829.
    This essay challenges the widely accepted principle that a person is morally responsible for what he has done only if he could have done otherwise. The author considers situations in which there are sufficient conditions for a certain choice or action to be performed by someone, So that it is impossible for the person to choose or to do otherwise, But in which these conditions do not in any way bring it about that the person chooses or acts as he (...)
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  • Freedom and Resentment.Peter Strawson - 1962 - Proceedings of the British Academy 48:187-211.
    The doyen of living English philosophers, by these reflections, took hold of and changed the outlook of a good many other philosophers, if not quite enough. He did so, essentially, by assuming that talk of freedom and responsibility is talk not of facts or truths, in a certain sense, but of our attitudes. His more explicit concern was to look again at the question of whether determinism and freedom are consistent with one another -- by shifting attention to certain personal (...)
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  • Moral Dimensions: Permissibility, Meaning, Blame.Thomas Scanlon - 2008 - Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
    The illusory appeal of double effect -- The significance of intent -- Means and ends -- Blame.
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  • What We Owe to Each Other.Thomas Scanlon - 1998 - Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
    In this book, T. M. Scanlon offers new answers to these questions, as they apply to the central part of morality that concerns what we owe to each other.
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  • Medical Ethics Needs a New View of Autonomy.R. L. Walker - 2008 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (6):594-608.
    The notion of autonomy commonly employed in medical ethics literature and practices is inadequate on three fronts: it fails to properly identify nonautonomous actions and choices, it gives a false account of which features of actions and choices makes them autonomous or nonautonomous, and it provides no grounds for the moral requirement to respect autonomy. In this paper I offer a more adequate framework for how to think about autonomy, but this framework does not lend itself to the kinds of (...)
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  • Responsibility for Attitudes: Activity and Passivity in Mental Life.Angela M. Smith - 2005 - Ethics 115 (2):236-271.
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  • Autonomy: A Defense of the Split-Level Self.John Christman - 1987 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 25 (3):281-293.
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  • What We Owe to Each Other.Thomas Scanlon - 2002 - Mind 111 (442):323-354.
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  • What is Wrong with Compliance?S. Holm - 1993 - Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (2):108-110.
    Non-compliance is a label often used about patients who do not follow therapeutic advice. This paper analyses the notion of compliance, and tries to show that this notion is inextricably bound to a paternalistic conception of the doctor-patient relationship. It is proposed that we should perhaps not talk so much about the non-compliant patient, but instead shift the focus towards the non-compliant doctor.
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  • Freedom From Necessity: The Metaphysical Basis of Responsibility.David Widerker - 1993 - Journal of Philosophy 90 (2):98.
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  • Responsibility and Control: A Theory of Moral Responsibility.John Martin Fischer & Mark Ravizza - 1999 - Philosophical Quarterly 49 (197):543-545.
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  • Patient and Citizen Participation in Health: The Need for Improved Ethical Support.Laura Williamson - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (6):4-16.
    Patient and citizen participation is now regarded as central to the promotion of sustainable health and health care. Involvement efforts create and encounter many diverse ethical challenges that have the potential to enhance or undermine their success. This article examines different expressions of patient and citizen participation and the support health ethics offers. It is contended that despite its prominence and the link between patient empowerment and autonomy, traditional bioethics is insufficient to guide participation efforts. In addition, the turn to (...)
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  • A History and Theory of Informed Consent.William G. Bartholome - 1988 - Ethics 98 (3):605-606.
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  • Book Review:Freedom From Necessity: The Metaphysical Basis of Responsibility. Bernard Berofsky. [REVIEW]Mark Ravizza - 1992 - Ethics 102 (4):846-.
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  • John Martin Fischer and Mark Ravizza: Responsibility and Control: A Theory of Moral Responsibility. [REVIEW]Michael McKenna - 2001 - Journal of Philosophy 98 (2):93-100.
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  • Relational Autonomy as an Essential Component of Patient-Centered Care.Carolyn Ells, Matthew R. Hunt & Jane Chambers-Evans - 2011 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (2):79-101.
    Over the past decade, patient-centered care has become increasingly prominent in discussions of health-care practice, policy, and organization. Patient-centered care is a holistic concept whereby health professionals individualize their encounters with each patient (Stewart 2001). Decision-making strategies, recommendations, and plans of care are all devised and acted upon in relation to the particular patient. The patient is assumed to have a unique configuration of elements comprising her identity, illness experience, and physical, social, and environmental context. While partnership is understood as (...)
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  • The Value of Autonomy and Autonomy of the Will.Stephen Darwall - 2006 - Ethics 116 (2):263-284.
    It is a commonplace that ‘autonomy’ has several different senses in contemporary moral and political discussion. The term’s original meaning was political: a right assumed by states to administer their own affairs. It was not until the nineteenth century that ‘autonomy’ came (in English) to refer also to the conduct of individuals, and even then there were, as now, different meanings.1 Odd as it may seem from our perspective, one that was in play from the beginning was Kant’s notion of (...)
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  • Bad Faith and Victimblaming: The Limits of Health Promotion. [REVIEW]Charles J. Dougherty - 1993 - Health Care Analysis 1 (2):111-119.
    Two models of the relationship between individual behaviour and health status are examined. On the Freedom Model, the individual is presumed to be capable of free choices including many that have important health consequences. Freedom entails accountability. Thus individuals can be held responsible for health conditions that result from choices they have made. To hold otherwise—to refuse to acknowledge the freedom and responsibilities of individuals—is bad faith. On the Facticity Model, behaviour is a result of facts—genetic and environmental—beyond an individual's (...)
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  • The Nature and Ethics of Blame.D. Justin Coates & Neal A. Tognazzini - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (3):197-207.
    Blame is usually discussed in the context of the free will problem, but recently moral philosophers have begun to examine it on its own terms. If, as many suppose, free will is to be understood as the control relevant to moral responsibility, and moral responsibility is to be understood in terms of whether blame is appropriate, then an independent inquiry into the nature and ethics of blame will be essential to solving (and, perhaps, even fully understanding) the free will problem. (...)
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  • The Theory and Practice of Autonomy.Gerald Dworkin - 1988 - Philosophy 64 (250):571-572.
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  • Autonomy.Joel Feinberg - 1989 - In John Philip Christman (ed.), The Inner Citadel: Essays on Individual Autonomy. Oxford University Press. pp. 27--53.
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