Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Computing Machinery and Intelligence.Alan M. Turing - 1950 - Mind 59 (October):433-60.
    I propose to consider the question, "Can machines think?" This should begin with definitions of the meaning of the terms "machine" and "think." The definitions might be framed so as to reflect so far as possible the normal use of the words, but this attitude is dangerous, If the meaning of the words "machine" and "think" are to be found by examining how they are commonly used it is difficult to escape the conclusion that the meaning and the answer to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   739 citations  
  • Thinking and Computing: Computers as Special Kinds of Signs.James Fetzer - 2001 - The Commens Encyclopedia: The Digital Encyclopedia of Peirce Studies.
    Cognitive science has been dominated by the computational conception that cogniton is computation across representations. To the extent to which cognition is supposed to be a purposive, meaningful, algorithmic, problem-solving activity, however, computers appear to be incapable of cognition. They are devices that can facilitate computations on the basis of semantic grounding relations as special kinds of signs. Even their algorithmic, problem-solving character arises from ther interpretation by human users. Strictly speaking, computers as such–apart from human users–are not only incapable (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Quasi‐Indexicals and Knowledge Reports.William J. Rapaport, Stuart C. Shapiro & Janyce M. Wiebe - 1997 - Cognitive Science 21 (1):63-107.
    We present a computational analysis of de re, de dicto, and de se belief and knowledge reports. Our analysis solves a problem first observed by Hector-Neri Castañeda, namely, that the simple rule -/- `(A knows that P) implies P' -/- apparently does not hold if P contains a quasi-indexical. We present a single rule, in the context of a knowledge-representation and reasoning system, that holds for all P, including those containing quasi-indexicals. In so doing, we explore the difference between reasoning (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Computation is Just Interpretable Symbol Manipulation; Cognition Isn't.Stevan Harnad - 1994 - Minds and Machines 4 (4):379-90.
    Computation is interpretable symbol manipulation. Symbols are objects that are manipulated on the basis of rules operating only on theirshapes, which are arbitrary in relation to what they can be interpreted as meaning. Even if one accepts the Church/Turing Thesis that computation is unique, universal and very near omnipotent, not everything is a computer, because not everything can be given a systematic interpretation; and certainly everything can''t be givenevery systematic interpretation. But even after computers and computation have been successfully distinguished (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Individualism and the Mental.Tyler Burge - 1979 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 4 (1):73-122.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1044 citations  
  • Thinking and Computing: Computers as Special Kinds of Signs. [REVIEW]James H. Fetzer - 1997 - Minds and Machines 7 (3):345-364.
    Cognitive science has been dominated by the computational conception that cognition is computation across representations. To the extent to which cognition as computation across representations is supposed to be a purposive, meaningful, algorithmic, problem-solving activity, however, computers appear to be incapable of cognition. They are devices that can facilitate computations on the basis of semantic grounding relations as special kinds of signs. Even their algorithmic, problem-solving character arises from their interpretation by human users. Strictly speaking, computers as such — apart (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Machine Mentality and the Nature of the Ground Relation.Darren Whobrey - 2001 - Minds and Machines 11 (3):307-346.
    John Searle distinguished between weak and strong artificial intelligence (AI). This essay discusses a third alternative, mild AI, according to which a machine may be capable of possessing a species of mentality. Using James Fetzer's conception of minds as semiotic systems, the possibility of what might be called ``mild AI'' receives consideration. Fetzer argues against strong AI by contending that digital machines lack the ground relationship required of semiotic systems. In this essay, the implementational nature of semiotic processes posited by (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach.Stuart Jonathan Russell & Peter Norvig (eds.) - 1995 - Prentice-Hall.
    Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach, 3e offers the most comprehensive, up-to-date introduction to the theory and practice of artificial intelligence. Number one in its field, this textbook is ideal for one or two-semester, undergraduate or graduate-level courses in Artificial Intelligence. Dr. Peter Norvig, contributing Artificial Intelligence author and Professor Sebastian Thrun, a Pearson author are offering a free online course at Stanford University on artificial intelligence. According to an article in The New York Times, the course on artificial intelligence is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   160 citations  
  • The Meaning of 'Meaning'.Hillary Putnam - 1975 - Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science 7:131-193.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1143 citations  
  • Collected Papers of Charles Sanders Peirce: Science and Philosophy and Reviews, Correspondence, and Bibliography.Charles S. Peirce - 1931 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
    PRINCIPLES OF PHILOSOPHY" CHAPTER 1 LESSONS FROM THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY §1. NOMINALISM* 15. Very early in my studies of logic, before I had really been ...
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   497 citations  
  • Brains and Behaviour.Hilary Putnam - 2003 - In John Heil (ed.), Philosophy of Mind: A Guide and Anthology. Oxford University Press.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Computing Machinery and Intelligence.Alan M. Turing - 2003 - In John Heil (ed.), Philosophy of Mind: A Guide and Anthology. Oxford University Press.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   495 citations  
  • Artificial Intelligence: Its Scope and Limits.James H. Fetzer - 1990 - Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    1. WHAT IS ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE? One of the fascinating aspects of the field of artificial intelligence (AI) is that the precise nature of its subject ..
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   133 citations  
  • A Biosemiotic Note On Organisms, Animals, Machines, Cyborgs, And The Quasi-Autonomy Of Robots.Claus Emmeche - 2007 - Pragmatics and Cognition 15 (3):455-483.
    It is argued in this paper that robots are just quasi-autonomous beings, which must be understood, within an emergent systems view, as intrinsically linked to and presupposing human beings as societal creatures within a technologically mediated world. Biosemiotics is introduced as a perspective on living systems that is based upon contemporary biology but reinterpreted through a qualitative organicist tradition in biology. This allows for emphasizing the differences between an organism as a general semiotic system with vegetative and self-reproductive capacities, an (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Brains and Behavior.Hilary Putnam - 1963 - In Ronald J. Butler (ed.), Analytical Philosophy: Second Series. Blackwell.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   77 citations  
  • Brains and Behaviour1.Hilary Putnam - 2002 - In David J. Chalmers (ed.), Philosophy of Mind: Classical and Contemporary Readings. Oxford University Press. pp. 45.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Computing Machinery and Intelligence.Allen M. Turing - 1950 - Mind 59 (236):433.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   243 citations  
  • The Glair Cognitive Architecture.Stuart C. Shapiro & Jonathan P. Bona - 2010 - International Journal of Machine Consciousness 2 (2):307-332.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • A Biosemiotic Note on Organisms, Animals, Machines, Cyborgs, and the Quasi-Autonomy of Robots.Claus Emmeche - 2007 - Pragmatics and Cognition 15 (3):455-483.
    It is argued in this paper that robots are just quasi-autonomous beings, which must be understood, within an emergent systems view, as intrinsically linked to and presupposing human beings as societal creatures within a technologically mediated world. Biosemiotics is introduced as a perspective on living systems that is based upon contemporary biology but reinterpreted through a qualitative organicist tradition in biology. This allows for emphasizing the differences between an organism as a general semiotic system with vegetative and self-reproductive capacities, an (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Phytosemiotics Revisited.Martin Krampen - forthcoming - Biosemiotics: The Semiotic Web 1991.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations