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  1. What is Normal? Dimensions of Action-Inaction Normality and Their Impact on Regret in the Action-Effect.Gilad Feldman - 2020 - Cognition and Emotion 34 (4):728-742.
    ABSTRACTThe widely-replicated action-effect describes a phenomenon in which negative outcomes are associated with higher regret when they are a result of action compared to inaction. The highly inf...
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  • Spontaneous Counterfactual Thoughts and Causal Explanations.Alice McEleney & Ruth M. J. Byrne - 2006 - Thinking and Reasoning 12 (2):235 – 255.
    We report two Experiments to compare counterfactual thoughts about how an outcome could have been different and causal explanations about why the outcome occurred. Experiment 1 showed that people generate counterfactual thoughts more often about controllable than uncontrollable events, whereas they generate causal explanations more often about unexpected than expected events. Counterfactual thoughts focus on specific factors, whereas causal explanations focus on both general and specific factors. Experiment 2 showed that in their spontaneous counterfactual thoughts, people focus on normal events (...)
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  • Undoing the Past in Order to Lie in the Present: Counterfactual Thinking and Deceptive Communication.Raluca A. Briazu, Clare R. Walsh, Catherine Deeprose & Giorgio Ganis - 2017 - Cognition 161:66-73.
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  • Normality: Part Descriptive, Part Prescriptive.Adam Bear & Joshua Knobe - 2017 - Cognition 167:25-37.
    People’s beliefs about normality play an important role in many aspects of cognition and life (e.g., causal cognition, linguistic semantics, cooperative behavior). But how do people determine what sorts of things are normal in the first place? Past research has studied both people’s representations of statistical norms (e.g., the average) and their representations of prescriptive norms (e.g., the ideal). Four studies suggest that people’s notion of normality incorporates both of these types of norms. In particular, people’s representations of what is (...)
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  • Norm Theory: Comparing Reality to its Alternatives.Daniel Kahneman & Dale T. Miller - 1986 - Psychological Review 93 (2):136-153.
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