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  1. Justice as Fairness: A Restatement.John Rawls & Erin Kelly - 2001 - Mind 112 (447):563-566.
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  • Why the Basic Structure?Louis-Philippe Hodgson - 2012 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 42 (3-4):303-334.
    John Rawls famously holds that the basic structure is the 'primary subject of justice.'1 By this, he means that his two principles of justice apply only to a society's major political and social institutions, including chiefly the constitution, the economic and legal systems, and (more contentiously) the family structure.2 This thesis — call it the basic structure restriction — entails that the celebrated difference principle has a narrower scope than one might have expected. It doesn't apply directly to choices that (...)
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  • Political Liberalism and Citizenship Education.Blain Neufeld - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (9):781-797.
    John Rawls claims that the kind of citizenship education required by political liberalism demands ‘far less’ than that required by comprehensive liberalism. Many educational and political theorists who have explored the implications of political liberalism for education policy have disputed Rawls's claim. Writing from a comprehensive liberal perspective, Amy Gutmann contends that the justificatory differences between political and comprehensive liberalism generally have no practical significance for citizenship education. Political liberals such as Stephen Macedo and Victoria Costa maintain that political liberalism (...)
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  • Freedom, Money and Justice as Fairness.Blain Neufeld - 2017 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 16 (1):70-92.
    The first principle of Rawls’s conception of justice secures a set of ‘basic liberties’ equally for all citizens within the constitutional structure of society. The ‘worth’ of citizens’ liberties, however, may vary depending upon their wealth. Against Rawls, Cohen contends that an absence of money often can directly constrain citizens’ freedom and not simply its worth. This is because money often can remove legally enforced constraints on what citizens can do. Cohen’s argument – if modified to apply to citizens’ ‘moral (...)
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  • Political Liberalism, Ethos Justice, and Gender Equality.Blain Neufeld & Chad Van Schoelandt - 2014 - Law and Philosophy 33 (1):75-104.
    Susan Okin criticizes John Rawls’s ‘political liberalism’ because it does not apply principles of justice directly to gender relations within households. We explain how one can be a ‘political liberal feminist’ by distinguishing between two kinds of justice: the first we call ‘legitimacy justice’, conceptions of which apply to the ‘legally coercive structure’ of society; the second we call ‘ethos justice’, conceptions of which apply to citizens’ ‘non-coercive’ relations. We agree with Okin that a society in which most persons act (...)
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  • Marxism, Morality, and Social Justice.Rodney G. Peffer - 1990 - Princeton University Press.
    In this book R. G. Peffer tackles the challenges of finding in Marx's work an implicit moral theory, of answering claims that Marxism is incompatible with morality, and of developing the outlines of an adequate Marxist moral and social ...
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  • Children, Paternalism, and Education: A Liberal Argument.Amy Gutmann - 1980 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 9 (4):338-358.
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  • Political Liberalism.J. Rawls - 1995 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 57 (3):596-598.
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  • Rawls on Constitutionalism and Constitutional Law.Frank Michelman - 2003 - In Samuel Richard Freeman (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Rawls. Cambridge University Press. pp. 394--425.
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  • Money Does Not Guarantee Time: Discretionary Time as a Distinct Object of Distributive Justice.Julie L. Rose - 2014 - Journal of Political Philosophy 22 (4):438-457.
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