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  1. Why There is Something Rather Than Nothing.Bede Rundle - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    The question, 'Why is there something rather than nothing?', has a strong claim to be philosophy's central, and most perplexing, question; it has a capacity to set the head spinning which few other philosophical problems can rival. Bede Rundle challenges the stalemate between theistic and naturalistic explanations with a rigorous, properly philosophical approach, and presents some startlingly novel conclusions.
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  • The Nature of Perception.N. M. L. Nathan - 2001 - Mind 110 (438):455-460.
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  • Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing.S. Law - 2004 - Philosophical Review 116 (2):300-303.
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  • Divine Intervention: Metaphysical and Epistemological Puzzles.Evan Fales - 2009 - Routledge.
    This study is a new look at the question of how God can act upon the world, and whether the world can affect God, examining contemporary work on the metaphysics of causation and laws of nature, and current work in the theory of knowledge and mysticism. It has been traditional to address such questions by appealing to God’s omnipotence and omniscience, but this book claims that this is useless unless it can be shown how these two powers "work." Instead of (...)
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  • The Nature of Perception.John Foster - 2000 - Philosophical Quarterly 51 (205):552-555.
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  • Dualism.Howard Robinson - 2002 - In Stephen P. Stich & Ted A. Warfield (eds.), Blackwell Guide to Philosophy of Mind. Blackwell. pp. 85--101.
    This entry concerns dualism in the philosophy of mind. The term ‘dualism’ has a variety of uses in the history of thought. In general, the idea is that, for some particular domain, there are two fundamental kinds or categories of things or principles. In theology, for example a ‘dualist’ is someone who believes that Good and Evil — or God and the Devil — are independent and more or less equal forces in the world. Dualism contrasts with monism, which is (...)
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  • Consciousness: The Transmutation of a Concept.Patricia S. Churchland - 1983 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 64 (January):80-95.
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  • Atheists: A Psychological Profile.Benjamin Beit-Hallahmi - 2007 - In Michael Martin (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Atheism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 300--317.
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