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  1. Nicolas Malebranche.Geneiviève Rodis-Lewis - 1963 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 20 (2):336-338.
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  • Self-Knowledge and Self-Deception.Hugo Strandberg - 2015 - Palgrave Macmillan.
    'Self-knowledge' and 'self-deception' are not so much the themes of this book as its primary tools: these concepts act as mirrors through which it is possible to reflect upon questions about the self. Strandberg explores what it is that becomes visible when we use these concepts as a means of looking at ourselves. The aim is to acquire a better understanding of what we mean when we ask the question 'who am I?'. By approaching the question from the perspective of (...)
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  • Descartes a Study of His Philosophy.Anthony John Patrick Kenny - 1968 - St. Augustine's Press.
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  • Descartes, the Cartesian Circle, and Epistemology Without God.Michael Della Rocca - 2005 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (1):1–33.
    This paper defends an interpretation of Descartes according to which he sees us as having normative (and not merely psychological) certainty of all clear and distinct ideas during the period in which they are apprehended clearly and distinctly. However, on this view, a retrospective doubt about clear and distinct ideas is possible. This interpretation allows Descartes to avoid the Cartesian Circle in an effective way and also shows that Descartes is surprisingly, in some respects, an epistemological externalist. The paper goes (...)
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  • Descartes on the Dubitability of the Existence of Self.David Cunning - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (1):111 - 131.
    In a number a passages Descartes appears to insist that "I am, I exist" and its variants are wholly indubitable. These passages present an intractable problem of interpretation in the face of passages in which Descartes allows that any result is dubitable, "I am, I exist" included. Here I pull together a number of elements of Descartes' system to show how all of these passages hang together. If my analysis is correct, it tells us something about the perspective that Descartes (...)
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  • Descartes: The Project of Pure Enquiry.Bernard Williams - 1978 - Routledge.
    Descartes has often been called the 'father of modern philosophy'. His attempts to find foundations for knowledge, and to reconcile the existence of the soul with the emerging science of his time, are among the most influential and widely studied in the history of philosophy. This is a classic and challenging introduction to Descartes by one of the most distinguished modern philosophers. Bernard Williams not only analyzes Descartes' project of founding knowledge on certainty, but uncovers the philosophical motives for his (...)
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  • Knowledge and its Limits.Timothy Williamson - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    Knowledge and its Limits presents a systematic new conception of knowledge as a kind of mental stage sensitive to the knower's environment. It makes a major contribution to the debate between externalist and internalist philosophies of mind, and breaks radically with the epistemological tradition of analyzing knowledge in terms of true belief. The theory casts new light on such philosophical problems as scepticism, evidence, probability and assertion, realism and anti-realism, and the limits of what can be known. The arguments are (...)
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  • Self-Knowledge.Brie Gertler - 2015 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    "Self-knowledge" is commonly used in philosophy to refer to knowledge of one's particular mental states, including one's beliefs, desires, and sensations. It is also sometimes used to refer to knowledge about a persisting self -- its ontological nature, identity conditions, or character traits. At least since Descartes, most philosophers have believed that self-knowledge is importantly different from knowledge of the world external to oneself, including others' thoughts. But there is little agreement about what precisely distinguishes self-knowledge from knowledge in other (...)
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  • Circumventing Cartesian Circles.Lex Newman & Alan Nelson - 1999 - Noûs 33 (3):370-404.
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  • Descartes and First Person Authority.Steven L. Reynolds - 1992 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 9 (2):181-189.
    Although Descartes apparently needs first person authority for his anti-skeptical project, his scattered remarks on it appear to be inconsistent. Why did he neglect this issue? According to E M Aurley, Descartes was answering Pyrrhonian skeptics, who could not consistently challenge him on it. This paper argues instead that Descartes assumed that his first person premises were certain qua clear and distinct perceptions, leaving first person authority a side issue.
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  • Le problème de l’inconscient et le cartésianisme.Geneviève Rodis-Lewis - 1950 - Presses Universitaires de France.
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  • Content and Justification: Philosophical Papers.Paul A. Boghossian - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume presents a series of influential essays by Paul Boghossian on the theory of content and on its relation to the phenomenon of a priori knowledge. The essays are organized under four headings: the nature of content; content and self-knowledge; knowledge, content, and the a priori; and colour concepts.
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  • Descartes' Method of Doubt.Janet Broughton - 2002 - Princeton University Press.
    "This stunning work is without question a major contribution to Cartesian studies, to the field of early modern philosophy, and to general epistemology- ...
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  • Consciousness and Life.Gareth B. Matthews - 1977 - Philosophy 52 (199):13-26.
    In L. Frank Baum's story, Ozma of Oz, which is a sequel to Baum's much more famous story, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Dorothy and her companion come upon a wound-down mechanical man bearing a label on which are printed the following words: Smith and Tinker's Patent Double-Action, Extra-Responsive, Thought-Creating Perfect-Talking MECHANICAL MAN Fitted with our Special Clock-Work Attachment Thinks, Speaks, Acts, and Does Everything but Live As Dorothy and her companion are made to discover when they wind up this (...)
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  • Argument and Persuasion in Descartes' Meditations.David Cunning - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    This important volume will be of great interest to scholars of early modern philosophy.
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  • Orders of Consciousness and Forms of Reflexivity in Descartes.Vili Lähteenmäki - 2007 - In Sara Heinämaa, Vili Lähteenmäki & Pauliina Remes (eds.), Consciousness: From Perception to Reflection in the History of Philosophy. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 177-201.
    Descartes affords several notions of consciousness as he explains the characteristics of the diverse features of human thought from infancy to adulthood and from dreaming to attentive wakefulness. The paper argues that Descartes has a rich and coherent view of conscious mentality from rudimentary consciousness through reflexive consciousness to consciousness achieved by deliberate, attentive reflection.
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  • Descartes.John Cottingham - 1986 - In Ted Honderich (ed.), The Philosophers: Introducing Great Western Thinkers. Oxford University Press.
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  • Descartes's Meditations: An Introduction.Catherine Wilson - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this introduction to a classic philosophical text, Catherine Wilson examines the arguments of Descartes' famous Meditations, the book which launched modern philosophy. Drawing on the reinterpretations of Descartes' thought of the past twenty-five years, she shows how Descartes constructs a theory of the mind, the body, nature, and God from a premise of radical uncertainty. She discusses in detail the historical context of Descartes' writings and their relationship to early modern science, and at the same time she introduces concepts (...)
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  • Descartes.Margaret Wilson - 1978 - Routledge.
    This book is available either individually, or as part of the specially-priced Arguments of the Philosphers Collection.
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  • The Concept of Mind.Gilbert Ryle - 1949 - Hutchinson & Co.
    This now-classic work challenges what Ryle calls philosophy's "official theory," the Cartesians "myth" of the separation of mind and matter. Ryle's linguistic analysis remaps the conceptual geography of mind, not so much solving traditional philosophical problems as dissolving them into the mere consequences of misguided language. His plain language and esstentially simple purpose place him in the traditioin of Locke, Berkeley, Mill, and Russell.
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  • Between Two Worlds: A Reading of Descartes’s Meditations.John Carriero - 2008 - Princeton University Press.
    Introduction -- The first meditation -- The second meditation -- The third meditation : the truth rule and the "chief and most common mistake" -- The third meditation : two demonstrations of God's existence -- The fourth meditation -- The fifth meditation -- The sixth meditation.
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  • Descartes’s Concept of Mind.Lilli Alanen - 2003 - Harvard University Press.
    This is the first book to give an analysis of Descartes's pivotal concept that deals with all the functions of the mind, cognitive as well as volitional, ...
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  • Learning from six philosophers. Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, 2 vol.Jonathan Bennett - 2001 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 191 (4):517-518.
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  • The Nature of the Mind.Marleen Rozemond - 2006 - In Stephen Gaukroger (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Descartes' Meditations. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 48--66.
    IN this paper I explain how Descartes's conception of the mind was novel in relation to Aristotelian scholasticism. I also argue against the standard view that Descartes believed in transparency of the mental, the view that one cannot make mistakes about one's own mental states.
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  • Introspection.Cynthia Macdonald - 2009 - In A. Beckermann, B. McLaughlin & S. Walter (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Mind. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. pp. 741-766.
    ‘Introspection’ is a term used by philosophers to refer to a special method or means by which one comes to know certain of one's own mental states; specifically, one's current conscious states. It derives from the Latin ‘spicere’, meaning ‘look’, and ‘intra’, meaning ‘within’; introspection is a process of looking inward. Introspectionist accounts of self-knowledge fall within the broader domain of theories of self-knowledge, understood as views about the nature of and basis for one's knowledge of one's own mental states, (...)
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  • Attention et simultanéité intellectuelle chez Descartes, Clauberg et Spinoza.Olivier Dubouclez - 2017 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 171 (1):27.
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  • Descartes's Self-Doubt.Donald Sievert - 1975 - Philosophical Review 84 (1):51-69.
    I contend that in the "meditations" descartes expresses both certainty and doubt that he exists. He is certain that he exists when he views himself in terms of occurrent acts of thinking; his certainty stems from his "observing" such acts. When he views himself in terms of an "unobservable" thinking substance, The belief that acts are in a thinking substance is central. Thinking substances can be known to exist only by demonstrating that this belief is true, And the demonstration can (...)
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  • Bewusstsein bei Descartes.Christian Barth - 2011 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 93 (2):162-194.
    For Descartes, consciousness is closely connected to the intellective perception of thought. This paper argues that the prevalent interpretations of Descartes's account of consciousness in terms of higher-order perception and self-representation fail. These interpretations mistakenly assume that Cartesian consciousness possesses the same theoretical structure in all cases. It is shown by a close analysis of relevant passages that for Descartes the consciousness of perceptions and the consciousness of volitions have different theoretical structures. From this analysis a more adequate picture of (...)
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  • The Cogito and the Foundations of Knowledge.Edwin Curley - 2006 - In Stephen Gaukroger (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Descartes' Meditations. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 30--47.
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  • Hume's Notions of Consciousness and Reflection in Context.Udo Thiel - 1994 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 2 (2):75 – 115.
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  • Cartesian Consciousness Reconsidered.Alison Simmons - 2012 - Philosophers' Imprint 12.
    Descartes revolutionized our conception of the mind by identifying consciousness as the mark of the mental: all and only thoughts are conscious. Today the idea that all thoughts are conscious seems obviously wrong. Worse, however, Descartes himself seems to posit a whole host of unconscious thoughts. Something is not as it seems. Either Descartes is remarkably inconsistent, or his claim that all thought is conscious is more nuanced than it appears. In this paper I argue that while Descartes was indeed (...)
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  • Introspection.Eric Schwitzgebel - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • Descartes's Argument for the Existence of the Idea of an Infinite Being.Anat Schechtman - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (3):487-517.
    the meditations on first philosophy presents us with an alleged proof for the existence of God that proceeds from the existence of an idea of an infinite being in the human mind—an idea of God—to the existence of God himself. Insofar as we have an idea of an infinite being, an idea with “infinite objective reality,” we can legitimately ask whence it came to us. The only possible cause of this idea, claims Descartes, is an infinite being, namely, God. The (...)
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  • The Transparency of Mind.Sarah K. Paul - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (5):295-303.
    In philosophical inquiry into the mind, the metaphor of ‘transparency’ has been attractive to many who are otherwise in deep disagreement. It has thereby come to have a variety of different and mutually incompatible connotations. The mind is said to be transparent to itself, our perceptual experiences are said to be transparent to the world, and our beliefs are said to be transparent to – a great many different things. The first goal of this essay is to sort out the (...)
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  • Thought and Consciousness in Descartes.Daisie Radner - 1988 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (3):439-452.
    Descartes uses the term "conscientia" (conscience) to apply both to consciousness of thinking and to the act of thinking itself. These are two different sorts of consciousness, And they stand in different relations to their objects. Consciousness as a way of thinking (c1) is neither necessary nor sufficient for the existence of its object. Consciousness of thinking (c2) is both necessary and sufficient for the existence of its object. The distinction between c1 and c2 provides descartes with a way out (...)
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  • The Cogito and its Importance.Peter Markie - 1992 - In John Cottingham (ed.), Descartes. Oxford University Press.
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  • Conscientia bei Descartes.Boris Hennig - 2006 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 60 (1):21-36.
    Obwohl ‚conscientia’ ein zentraler Grundbegriff der cartesischen Metaphysik ist, sagt Descartes nirgends explizit, was er damit meint. Auch aus der Art und Weise, in der er das Wort verwendet, lässt sich dessen Bedeutung nicht vollends erschließen. Insbesondere handelt es sich nicht um einen reflexiven Denkakt (cogitatio), nicht um eine Disposition zum Haben solcher cogitationes und nicht um eine Art Aufmerksamkeit. Um die Bedeutung des Begriffes zu klären, schlage ich vor, auf klassische Texte von Augustinus, Thomas von Aquin und jesuitischen Autoren (...)
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  • Cartesian Conscientia.Boris Hennig - 2007 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (3):455-484.
    Although Descartes is often said to have coined the modern notion of ‘consciousness’, he defines it neither explicitly nor implicitly. This may imply (1) that he was not the first to use ‘conscientia’ in its modern, psychological sense, or (2) that he still used it in its traditional moral sense. In this paper, I argue for the latter assumption. Descartes used ‘conscientia’ according to the meaning we also find in texts of St. Paul, Augustine, Aquinas and later scholastics. Thus the (...)
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  • Was Bedeutet ‚Conscientia' Bei Descartes.Boris Hennig - 2004 - Dissertation, Universität Leipzig
    Obwohl 'conscientia' ein zentraler Grundbegriff der cartesischen Metaphysik ist, sagt Descartes nirgends explizit, was er damit meint. Auch aus der Art und Weise, in der er das Wort verwendet, lässt sich dessen Bedeutung nicht vollends erschließen. Insbesondere handelt es sich nicht um einen reflexiven Denkakt (cogitatio), nicht um eine Disposition zum Haben solcher cogitationes und nicht um eine Art Aufmerksamkeit. Um die Bedeutung des Begriffes zu klären, schlage ich vor, auf klassische Texte von Augustinus, Thomas von Aquin und jesuitischen Autoren (...)
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  • Spinoza.Alan Donagan - 1988 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 40 (2):119-121.
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  • Transparent Minds: A Study of Self-Knowledge.Jordi Fernandez - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    How do we know our current states of mind--what we want, and believe in? Jordi Fernández proposes a new theory of self-knowledge, challenging the traditional view that it is a matter of introspection. He argues that we know what we believe and desire by 'looking outward', towards the states of affairs which those beliefs and desires are about.
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  • Attention in Early Scientific Psychology.Gary Hatfield - 1998 - In Richard D. Wright (ed.), Visual Attention. Oxford University Press. pp. 3-25.
    Attention only "recently"--i.e. in the eighteenth century--achieved chapter status in psychology textbooks in which psychology is conceived as a natural science. This report first sets this entrance, by sketching the historical contexts in which psychology has been considered to be a natural science. It then traces the construction of phenomenological descriptions of attention from antiquity to the seventeenth century, noting various aspects of attention that were marked for discussion by Aristotle, Lucretius, Augustine, and Descartes. The chapter goes on to compare (...)
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  • Transparency of Mind: The Contributions of Descartes, Leibniz, and Berkeley to the Genesis of the Modern Subject.Gary Hatfield - 2011 - In Hubertus Busche (ed.), Departure for Modern Europe: A Handbook of Early Modern Philosophy (1400-1700). Felix Meiner Verlag. pp. 361–375.
    The chapter focuses on attributions of the transparency of thought to early modern figures, most notably Descartes. Many recent philosophers assume that Descartes believed the mind to be “transparent”: since all mental states are conscious, we are therefore aware of them all, and indeed incorrigibly know them all. Descartes, and Berkeley too, do make statements that seem to endorse both aspects of the transparency theses (awareness of all mental states; incorrigibility). However, they also make systematic theoretical statements that directly countenance (...)
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  • Descartes Against the Skeptics.Edwin Curley - 1978 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 171 (3):350-351.
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  • Descartes, Epistemic Principles, Epistemic Circularity, and Scientia.Keith DeRose - 1992 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 73 (3):220-238.
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  • Self-Knowledge for Humans.Quasim Cassam - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Humans are not model epistemic citizens. Our reasoning can be careless, our beliefs eccentric, and our desires irrational. Quassim Cassam develops a new account of self-knowledge which recognises this feature of human life. He argues that self-knowledge is a genuine cognitive achievement, and that self-ignorance is almost always on the cards.
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  • Augustine and Descartes on the Function of Attention in Perceptual Awareness.Deborah Brown - 2007 - Studies in the History of Philosophy of Mind 4:153-175.
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  • Consciousness in Early Modern Philosophy: Remarks on Udo Thiel.Christian Barth - 2016 - Kant-Studien 107 (3):515-525.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Kant-Studien Jahrgang: 107 Heft: 3 Seiten: 515-525.
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  • Leibnizian Conscientia and its Cartesian Roots.Christian Barth - 2011 - Studia Leibnitiana 43 (2):216-236.
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  • Thought-Talk: Descartes and Sellars on Intentionality.Lilli Alanen - 1992 - American Philosophical Quarterly 29 (1):19-34.
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