Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. How to Do Things with Words.John Langshaw Austin - 1962 - Clarendon Press.
    For this second edition, the editors have returned to Austin's original lecture notes, amending the printed text where it seemed necessary.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1074 citations  
  • When Truth Gives Out.Mark Richard - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    Is the point of belief and assertion invariably to think or say something true? Is the truth of a belief or assertion absolute, or is it only relative to human interests? Most philosophers think it incoherent to profess to believe something but not think it true, or to say that some of the things we believe are only relatively true. Common sense disagrees. It sees many opinions, such as those about matters of taste, as neither true nor false; it takes (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   94 citations  
  • Conversational Exercitives: Something Else We Do with Our Words.Mary Kate McGowan - 2004 - Linguistics and Philosophy 27 (1):93-111.
    In this paper, I present a new (i.e., previously overlooked) breed of exercitive speech act (the conversational exercitive). I establish that any conversational contribution that invokes a rule of accommodation changes the bounds of conversational permissibility and is therefore an (indirect) exercitive speech act. Such utterances enact permissibility facts without expressing the content of such facts, without the speaker intending to be enacting such facts and without the hearer recognizing that it is so. Because of the peculiar nature ofthe rules (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • Oppressive Speech.Mary Kate McGowan - 2009 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (3):389 – 407.
    I here present two different models of oppressive speech. My interest is not in how speech can cause oppression, but in how speech can actually be an act of oppression. As we shall see, a particular type of speech act, the exercitive, enacts permissibility facts. Since oppressive speech enacts permissibility facts that oppress, speech must be exercitive in order for it to be an act of oppression. In what follows, I distinguish between two sorts of exercitive speech acts (the standard (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  • Speech Acts and Unspeakable Acts.Rae Langton - 1993 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 22 (4):293-330.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   153 citations  
  • Free Speech and Illocution.Rae Langton & Jennifer Hornsby - 1998 - Legal Theory 4 (1):21-37.
    We defend the view of some feminist writers that the notion of silencing has to be taken seriously in discussions of free speech. We assume that what ought to be meant by ‘speech’, in the context ‘free speech’, is whatever it is that a correct justification of the right to free speech justifies one in protecting. And we argue that what one ought to mean includes illocution, in the sense of J.L. Austin.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   76 citations  
  • Silencing Speech.Ishani Maitra - 2009 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 39 (2):pp. 309-338.
    Pornography deserves special protections, it is often said, because it qualifies as speech. Therefore, no matter what we think of its content, we must afford it the protections that we extend to most speech, but don’t extend to other actions.1 In response, Jennifer Hornsby and Rae Langton have argued that the case is not so simple: one of the harms of pornography, they claim, is that it silences women’s speech, thereby preventing women from deriving from speech the very benefits that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  • Speech Acts: An Essay in the Philosophy of Language.John R. Searle - 1969 - Cambridge University Press.
    Written in an outstandingly clear and lively style, this 1969 book provokes its readers to rethink issues they may have regarded as long since settled.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   683 citations  
  • Scorekeeping in a Language Game.David K. Lewis - 1979 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 8 (1):339--359.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   599 citations  
  • Speech Acts: An Essay in the Philosophy of Language.William P. Alston - 1970 - Philosophical Quarterly 20 (79):172-179.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   751 citations  
  • Scorekeeping in a Pornographic Language Game.Rae Langton & Caroline West - 1999 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (3):303 – 319.
    If, as many suppose, pornography changes people, a question arises as to how.1 One answer to this question offers a grand and noble vision. Inspired by the idea that pornography is speech, and inspired by a certain liberal ideal about the point of speech in political life, some theorists say that pornography contributes to that liberal ideal: pornography, even at its most violent and misogynistic, and even at its most harmful, is political speech that aims to express certain views about (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   46 citations  
  • Illocutionary Force and Semantic Content.Mitchell S. Green - 2000 - Linguistics and Philosophy 23 (5):435-473.
    Illocutionary force and semantic content are widely held to occupy utterly different categories in at least two ways: Any expression serving as an indicator of illocutionary force must be without semantic content, and no such expression can embed. A refined account of the force/content distinction is offered here that does the explanatory work that the standard distinction does, while, in accounting for the behavior of a range of parenthetical expressions, shows neither nor to be compulsory. The refined account also motivates (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  • Speech Acts.J. Searle - 1969 - Foundations of Language 11 (3):433-446.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   449 citations  
  • Racial Cognition and the Ethics of Implicit Bias.Daniel Kelly & Erica Roedder - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (3):522–540.
    We first describe recent empirical research on racial cognition, particularly work on implicit racial biases that suggests they are widespread, that they can coexist with explicitly avowed anti-racist and tolerant attitudes, and that they influence behavior in a variety of subtle but troubling ways. We then consider a cluster of questions that the existence and character of implicit racial biases raise for moral theory. First, is it morally condemnable to harbor an implicit racial bias? Second, ought each of us to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  • Scorekeeping in a Language Game.David K. Lewis - 1979 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 8 (3):339.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   279 citations  
  • Stereotypes And Stereotyping: A Moral Analysis.Lawrence Blum - 2004 - Philosophical Papers 33 (3):251-289.
    Stereotypes are false or misleading generalizations about groups held in a manner that renders them largely, though not entirely, immune to counterevidence. In doing so, stereotypes powerfully shape the stereotyper's perception of stereotyped groups, seeing the stereotypic characteristics when they are not present, failing to see the contrary of those characteristics when they are, and generally homogenizing the group. A stereotyper associates a certain characteristic with the stereotyped group?for example Blacks with being athletic?but may do so with a form of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  • The Limits of Free Speech: Pornography and the Question of Coverage.Ishani Maitra & Mary Kate McGowan - 2007 - Legal Theory 13 (1):41-68.
    Many liberal societies are deeply committed to freedom of speech. This commitment is so entrenched that when it seems to come into conflict with other commitments (e.g., gender equality), it is often argued that the commitment to speech must trump the other commitments. In this paper, we argue that a proper understanding of our commitment to free speech requires being clear about what should count as speech for these purposes. On the approach we defend, should get a special, technical sense, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Conversational Exercitives and the Force of Pornography.Mary Kate Mcgowan - 2003 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 31 (2):155-189.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  • Hate Speech, Illocution, and Social Context: A Critique of Judith Butler.Lisa H. Schwartzman - 2002 - Journal of Social Philosophy 33 (3):421–441.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Beyond Belief: Pragmatics in Hate Speech and Pornography1.Rae Langton - 2012 - In Mary Kate McGowan Ishani Maitra (ed.), Speech and Harm: Controversies Over Free Speech. pp. 72.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • Oppressions: Racial and Other.S. Haslanger - forthcoming - Racism in Mind:97--123.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations