Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Why a Bodily Resurrection?: The Bodily Resurrection and the Mind/Body Relation.Joshua Mugg & James T. Turner - 2017 - Journal of Analytic Theology 5:121-144.
    The doctrine of the resurrection says that God will resurrect the body that lived and died on earth—that the post-mortem body will be numerically identical to the pre-mortem body. After exegetically supporting this claim, and defending it from a recent objection, we ask: supposing that the doctrine of the resurrection is true, what are the implications for the mind-body relation? Why would God resurrect the body that lived and died on earth? We compare three accounts of the mind-body relation that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Jet Lag Theory of Purgatory.Adam Green - 2015 - Faith and Philosophy 32 (2):146-160.
    Models of purgatory tend to come paired with an operative conception of what perfection consists in. In the recent philosophical literature, two models, the satisfaction model and the sanctification model, have been pitted against one another. The former focuses on innocence before the law and makes purgatory out to be a place where a debt of punishment is paid. The latter focuses on moral character and describes purgatory in terms of character formation. If perfection consists in a certain way of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Sanctification, Satisfaction, and the Purpose of Purgatory.Neal Judisch - 2009 - Faith and Philosophy 26 (2):167-185.
    Recent years have seen a resurgence of interest in the doctrine of purgatory among Christian philosophers. Some of these philosophers argue for the existence of purgatory from principles consistent with historic Protestant theology and then attempt, on the basis of those principles, to formulate a distinctively Protestant view of purgatory—i.e., one that differs essentially from the Catholic doctrine as regards purgatory’s raison d’etre. Here I aim to show that Protestant models of purgatory which are grounded in the necessity of becoming (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Purgatory and the Dilemma of Sanctification.Justin D. Barnard - 2007 - Faith and Philosophy 24 (3):311-330.
    Christian Protestants typically affirm both the essential moral perfection of heaven and the sufficiency of saving faith. Yet these two commitments generatean apparently self-destructive dilemma—one I call the dilemma of sanctification. The prima facie puzzle can be resolved in at least three ways. In this paper, I articulate the dilemma of sanctification in some detail and offer an argument against a widely-held Protestant solution I call provisionism. This constitutes indirect support for the solution I find most promising, namely, a doctrine (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Sanctification Argument for Purgatory.David Vander Laan - 2007 - Faith and Philosophy 24 (3):331-339.
    A recently advanced argument for purgatory hinges on the need for complete sanctification before one can enter heaven. The argument has a modal gap.The gap can be exploited to fashion a competing account of how sanctification occurs in the afterlife according to which it is in part a heavenly process.The competing account usefully complicates the overall case for purgatory and raises questions about how the notion ought to be understood.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Why a Bodily Resurrection?: The Bodily Resurrection and the Mind/Body Relation.Mugg Joshua & James T. Turner Jr - 2017 - Journal of Analytic Theology 5:121-144.
    The doctrine of the resurrection says that God will resurrect the body that lived and died on earth—that the post-mortem body will be numerically identical to the pre-mortem body. After exegetically supporting this claim, and defending it from a recent objection, we ask: supposing that the doctrine of the resurrection is true, what are the implications for the mind-body relation? Why would God resurrect the body that lived and died on earth? We compare three accounts of the mind-body relation that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • On the Horns of a Dilemma: Bodily Resurrection or Disembodied Paradise?James T. Turner - 2014 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 75 (5):406-421.
    In the sixteenth century, Sir Thomas More criticized Martin Luther’s purported denial of a conscious intermediate state between bodily death and bodily resurrection. In the same century, William Tyndale penned a response in defense of Luther’s view. His argument essentially defended the proposition: If the Intermediate State obtains, then bodily resurrection is superfluous for those in the paradisiacal state. In this article, I enter the fray and argue for the truth of this conditional claim. And, like William Tyndale, I use (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Time and Space.L. N. Oaklander - 2003 - Mind 112 (447):509-513.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  • Time and Space.Barry Dainton - 2001 - Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    These are just some of the fundamental questions addressed in Time and Space. Writing for a primary readership of advanced undergraduate and graduate philosophy students, Barry Dainton introduces the central ideas and arguments that make space and time such philosophically challenging topics. Although recognising that many issues in the philosophy of time and space involve technical features of physics, Dainton has been careful to keep the conceptual issues accessible to students with little scientific or mathematical training. Surveying historical debates and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   50 citations  
  • No Explanation of Persons, No Explanation of Resurrection: On Lynne Baker’s Constitution View and the Resurrection of Human Persons.James T. Turner - 2014 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 76 (3):297-317.
    I don’t think Lynne Rudder Baker’s constitution view can account for personal identity problems of a synchronic or diachronic nature. As such, it cannot accommodate the Christian’s claim of eschatological bodily resurrection-a principle reason for which she gives this account. In light of this, I press objections against her constitution view in the following ways: First, I critique an analogy she draws between Aristotle’s “accidental sameness” and constitution. Second, I address three problems for Baker’s constitution view [‘Constitution Problems’ ], each (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • No Heaven Without Purgatory.David Brown - 1985 - Religious Studies 21 (4):447.
    If Purgatory is given a role at all in modern conceptions of the after–life, it is likely to be at most of the kind found in Hick and Rahner, in providing a second chance for those of whom it might be argued that they have had no proper opportunity in this life. Apart from its intermediate character, however, this account has very little in common with the traditional conception, whereas it seems to me that philosophical reasons, partly conceptual and partly (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Body, Soul, and Life Everlasting.John W. Cooper - 1994 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 35 (1):57-59.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Purgatory: The Logic of Total Transformation.Jerry L. Walls - 2012 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Jerry L. Walls, the author of books on hell and heaven, completes his tour of the afterlife with a philosophical and theological exploration and defense of purgatory, the traditional teaching that most Christians require a period of postmortem cleansing and purging of their sinful dispositions and imperfections before they will be fully made ready for heaven. He examines Protestant objections to the doctrine and shows that the doctrine of purgatory has been construed in different ways, some of which are fully (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation