Results for 'Formicidae'

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  1. Variation in Nesting Behavior of the Arboreal Ant Camponotus Sericeiventris (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).Elisa Furtado Fernandes, Mariana Monteiro de Castro, Bruno Corrêa Barbosa & Fábio Prezoto - 2014 - The Florida Entomologist 97 (3):1237-1239.
    This is the first record of nesting in the soil by the ant Camponotus sericeiventris (Guérin-Méneville, 1838), which has arboreal habit. The study was conducted in southeastern Brazil, in an ant colony located in a subterranean site. This study describes, for the first time, the ability of this arboreal species to vary its nesting site by the occupation of an unusual place in an urban environment; and this study demonstrates that this species is an interesting model for studies in urban (...)
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  2. Nesting Polybia Rejecta (Fabricius) (Hymenoptera: Vespidae) Associated with Azteca Chartifex Forel (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in Ecotone Caatinga/Atlantic Forest, in the State of Rio Grande Do Norte.Francisco Virgínio - 2015 - Entomobrasillis 8 (3).
    Some neotropical social wasps which are associated with some vertebrates and other insects like ants, and these interactions are reported for decades, but little is known about the presence of these in the Caatinga and Atlantic Forest. This study describes the first association’s record between nests of Polybia rejecta (Fabricius) wasp and Azteca chartifex Forel ants in the transition area of the Atlantic Forest and Caatinga in Rio Grande do Norte. The observations were in a private forest in Monte Alegre, (...)
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  3. Foraging Behavior of Fire Ant Solenopsis Saevissima (Smith) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in Felis Catus Linnaeus (Carnivora: Felidae) Carcass.Tatiane Tagliatti Maciel, Bruno Corrêa Barbosa & Fabio Prezoto - 2016 - Sociobiology 62 (4).
    Solenopsis saevissima fire ants were found foraging in a Felis catus carcass over tissues an secretions present in holes and mucosa. The ants built a dirt-made physical structure around the carcass, which prevented necrophagous flies from laying eggs or larvae in the body. These observations are relevant to increasing knowledge on the role of this ant genus in the decaying process of other animal corpses, including humans.
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