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  1. The Pandemic Experience Survey II: A Second Corpus of Subjective Reports of Life Under Social Restrictions During COVID-19 in the UK, Japan, and Mexico.Mark M. James, Havi Carel, Matthew Ratcliffe, Tom Froese, Jamila Rodrigues, Ekaterina Sangati, Morgan Montoya, Federico Sangati & Natalia Koshkina - 2022 - Frontiers in Public Health.
    In August 2021, Froese et al. published survey data collected from 2,543 respondents on their subjective experiences living under imposed social distancing measures during COVID-19 (1). The questionnaire was issued to respondents in the UK, Japan, and Mexico. By combining the authors’ expertise in phenomenological philosophy, phenomenological psychopathology, and enactive cognitive science, the questions were carefully phrased to prompt reports that would be useful to phenomenological investigation and theorizing (2–4). These questions reflected the various author’s research interests (e.g., technology, grief, (...)
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  2. Do digital hugs work? Re-embodying our social lives online with digital tact.Mark M. James & John F. Leader - 2023 - Frontiers in Psychology 14 (910174):1-15.
    The COVID-19 pandemic led to social restrictions that often prevented us from hugging the ones we love. This absence helped some realize just how important these interactions are to our sense of care and connection. Many turned to digitally mediated social interactions to address these absences, but often unsatisfactorily. Some theorists might blame this on the disembodied character of our digital spaces, e.g., that interpersonal touch is excluded from our lives online. However, others continued to find care and connection in (...)
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  3. From tech to tact: emotion dysregulation in online communication during the COVID-19 pandemic.Mark M. James - 2023 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences (5):1-32.
    Recent theorizing argues that online communication technologies provide powerful, although precarious, means of emotional regulation. We develop this understanding further. Drawing on subjective reports collected during periods of imposed social restrictions under COVID-19, we focus on how this precarity is a source of emo-tional dysregulation. We make our case by organizing responses into five distinct but intersecting dimensions wherein the precarity of this regulation is most relevant: infrastructure, functional use, mindful design (individual and social), and digital tact. Analyzing these reports, (...)
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  4. Enacting Ontological Design: A Vocabulary of Change from Organisms to Organisations.Mark M. James - 2022 - In Davide Secchi, Rasmus Gahrn-Andersen & Stephen J. Cowley (eds.), Organizational Cognition: The Theory of Social Organizing. Taylor & Francis.
    In this chapter, the frameworks of enactive cognitive science (e.g., Baran- diaran 2008, 2017; Di Paolo et al. 2018) and ontological design, particu- larly the work of Tony Fry (e.g., 2009), are synthesized to give a general account of how humans act toward change at multiple scales. According to this synthesis, design is understood as a spatiotemporally extended form of adaptive self-regulation, or adaptivity in the enactive vocabulary (Di Paolo 2005). When we design, we regulate ourselves in the local-present to (...)
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  5. Examining participatory sense-making frames: how autonomous patterns of being together emerge in recurrent social interaction.Mark M. James - 2021 - Dissertation, University College Dublin
    This thesis investigates how recurrent face-to-face social interactions engender relatively invariant patterns of being together that cause those who instantiate them to act in ways that support their reproduction. Existing accounts within both cognitive science and sociology offer important insights into the consideration of patterns of being together. However, given their explanatory strategies, they struggle to integrate both ‘social’ and ‘individual’ levels of explanation. Herein a compatibilist account is developed, intended as a ‘third way’ that obviates the limitations of existing (...)
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