Order:
See also
Renée Nicole Souris
Florida Institute of Technology
Renee Nicole Souris
Florida Institute of Technology
  1.  73
    African Challenges to the International Criminal Court: An Example of Populism?Renee Nicole Souris - 2020 - In AMINTAPHIL: The Philosophical Foundations of Law and Justice. pp. 255-268.
    Recent global efforts of the United States and England to withdraw from international institutions, along with recent challenges to human rights courts from Poland and Hungary, have been described as part of a growing global populist backlash against the liberal international order. Several scholars have even identified the recent threat of mass withdrawal of African states from the International Criminal Court (ICC) as part of this global populist backlash. Are the African challenges to the ICC part of a global populist (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  92
    Parents, Privacy, and Facebook: Legal and Social Responses to the Problem of Over-Sharing.Renée Nicole Souris - 2018 - In Ann Cudd & Mark Christopher Navin (eds.), Core Concepts and Contemporary Issues in Privacy. Springer. pp. 175-188.
    This paper examines whether American parents legally violate their children’s privacy rights when they share embarrassing images of their children on social media without their children’s consent. My inquiry is motivated by recent reports that French authorities have warned French parents that they could face fines and imprisonment for such conduct, if their children sue them once their children turn 18. Where French privacy law is grounded in respect for dignity, thereby explaining the French concerns for parental “over-sharing,” I show (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Virtue Ethics, Criminal Responsibility, and Dominic Ongwen.Renée Nicole Souris - 2019 - International Criminal Law Review 19 (3).
    In this article, I contribute to the debate between two philosophical traditions—the Kantian and the Aristotelian—on the requirements of criminal responsibility and the grounds for excuse by taking this debate to a new context: international criminal law. After laying out broadly Kantian and Aristotelian conceptions of criminal responsibility, I defend a quasi-Aristotelian conception, which affords a central role to moral development, and especially to the development of moral perception, for international criminal law. I show than an implication of this view (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark