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Stephen Michelman
Wofford College
  1.  40
    French Philosophy in the Twentieth Century. [REVIEW]Stephen Michelman - 2003 - Teaching Philosophy 26 (1):89-93.
    One of the chief virtues of Gutting’s book is its ambition to tell the “relatively self-contained and coherent story” (xi) of French philosophy in this century, not just the parts of the story that American academics have seized upon as distinctive and interesting. Alongside analyses of well-known philosophers like Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Foucault, and Derrida (a 30-40 page chapter is devoted to each), Gutting provides excellent chronological summaries of early figures like Félix Ravaisson, Jules Lachelier, Léon Brunschvicg, Henri Bergson, and Gaston (...)
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  2.  16
    Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Nietzsche on Morality. [REVIEW]S. Michelman - 2005 - Teaching Philosophy 28 (1):83-88.
    Leiter’s book serves, in one sense, as a summation of two decades of scholarship during which American and British philosophers have sought to reframe Nietzsche’s philosophy in terms of traditional analytic concerns in ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics and thereby to challenge (or simply ignore) dominant Continental readings. Richard Schacht’s comprehensive Nietzsche (Routledge 1983) marked the beginning of this effort. The work of Maudemarie Clark, with whom Leiter has collabroated on other projects, represents another landmark.
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  3.  12
    Sartre on Sin: Between Being and Nothingness. [REVIEW]Stephen Michelman - 2018 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 6 (35).
    Kate Kirkpatrick's provocative interdisciplinary study argues that Sartre's conception of nothingness in Being and Nothingness (BN) can be fruitfully understood as an iteration of the Christian doctrine of original sin, "nothingness" being synonymous with sin and evil in the Augustinian tradition. Hence, Sartre in BN presents us with "a phenomenology of sin from a graceless position" (10). For readers used to understanding Sartre through the lens of German phenomenology, this will come as a surprise. However, the book should be welcomed (...)
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  4.  11
    "Sociology Before Linguistics: Lacan's Debt to Durkheim".Stephen Michelman - 1996 - In François Raffoul & David Pettigrew (eds.), Disseminating Lacan. Albany, NY, USA:
    Commentators have long remarked the influence of Lévi-Strauss on Lacan, yet they have largely ignored important philosophical parallels between Lacan and Emile Durkheim, Lévi-Strauss's predecessor in the French anthropological tradition. I suggest that we are better served by understanding Lacan as heir to Durkheim rather than Lévi-Strauss, especially when Lévi-Strauss is seen as the ambassador of a new "scientific" method ("structural anthropology") modeled on structural linguistics. Lacan's reference to linguistics is, I maintain, a red herring that has misled interpreters. Instead, (...)
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