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  1.  56
    Does God Exist Because He Ought To Exist?William F. Vallicella - 2018 - In Mirosław Szatkowski (ed.), Ontology of Theistic Beliefs. De Gruyter. pp. 205-212.
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  2.  90
    Hugh McCann on the Implications of Divine Sovereignty.William F. Vallicella - 2014 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 88 (1):149-161.
    This review article summarizes and in part criticizes Hugh J. McCann’s detailed elaboration of the consequences of the idea that God is absolutely sovereign and thus unlimited in knowledge and power in his 2012 Creation and the Sovereignty of God. While there is much to agree with in McCann’s treatment, it is argued that divine sovereignty cannot extend as far as he would like to extend it. The absolute lord of the natural and moral orders cannot be absolutely sovereign over (...)
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  3.  47
    Arianna Betti: Against Facts.William F. Vallicella - 2016 - Metaphysica 17 (2).
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  4.  49
    Butchvarov on the Dehumanization of Philosophy.William F. Vallicella - 2016 - Studia Neoaristotelica 13 (2):181-196.
    This review article examines Panayot Butchvarov’s claim that philosophy in its three main branches, epistemology, ethics, and metaphysics, needs to be freed from anthropocentrism.
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  5.  29
    Bo R. Meinertsen: Metaphysics of States of Affairs: Truthmaking, Universals, and a Farewell to Bradley’s Regress. [REVIEW]William F. Vallicella - 2020 - Metaphysica 21 (1):167-177.
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  6. Can the Chariot Take Us to the Land of No Self?William F. Vallicella - 2006 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 9:29-33.
    This paper examines a famous argument for the Buddhist doctrine of anatta ("no self) according to which nothing possesses self-nature or substantial reality. The argument unfolds during a debate between the monk Nagasena and King Milinda (Menandros). Nagasena's challenge to the King is that he demonstrate the substantial reality of the chariot in which he arrived at their meeting when said chariot is (i) not identical to any one of its proper parts, (ii) not identical to the mereological sum of (...)
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  7.  34
    Facts: An Essay in Aporetics.William F. Vallicella - 2016 - In Francesco Federico Calemi (ed.), Metaphysics and Scientific Realism: Essays in Honour of David Malet Armstrong. De Gruyter. pp. 105-132.
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  8. No Self?: A Look at a Buddhist Argument.William F. Vallicella - 2002 - International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (4):453-466.
    Central to Buddhist thought and practice is the anattā doctrine. In its unrestricted form the doctrine amounts to the claim that nothing at all possesses self-nature. This article examines an early Buddhist argument for the doctrine. The argument, roughly, is that (i) if anything were a self, it would be both unchanging and self-determining; (ii) nothing has both of these properties; therefore, (iii) nothing is a self. The thesis of this article is that, despite the appearance of formal validity, the (...)
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  9.  81
    Van Inwagen on Fiction, Existence, Properties, Particulars, and Method.William F. Vallicella - 2015 - Studia Neoaristotelica 12 (2):99-125.
    This paper is a review of the book "Existence: Essays in Ontology" by Peter Van Inwagen.
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