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  1. added 2016-12-04
    Legge e diritto naturale in Alasdair MacIntyre.G. Cavallo - 2014 - Il Pensare:24-34.
    This paper focuses on the theme of natural rights, as it emerges from the works of Alasdair MacIntyre. In "After Virtue" he argues that «there are no such rights, and belief in them is one with belief in witches and in unicorns», but in later works he endorsed a thomistic view on natural law, which is compatible with the acknowledgment of universal human rights. MacIntyre’s writings contain the premises for an ontological foundation of natural rights, despite his rejection of any (...)
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  2. added 2016-10-06
    Bioethics, Culture and Collaboration.Nicholas Tonti-Filippini - 2012 - Solidarity: The Journal of Catholic Social Thought and Secular Ethics 2 (1):Article 5.
    The practical problem of how to conduct oneself as a Christian and a Philosopher or Bioethicist in public debate an when asked to be engaged in government committees is difficult. One solution that has had some support has been to approach the issues on the grounds of our natural law tradition but understood anthropocentrically – the ultimate end is not communion with God by integral human development. This is often called New Natural Law (NNL). This separation of Philosophy and Theology (...)
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  3. added 2016-06-03
    Is Society-Centered Moral Theory a Contemporary Version of Natural Law Theory?David Copp - 2009 - Dialogue 48 (1):19-36.
    ABSTRACT: David Braybrooke argues that the core of the natural law theory of Thomas Aquinas survived in the work of Hobbes, Locke, Hume, and Rousseau. Much to my surprise, Braybrooke argues as well that David Copp’s society-centered moral theory is a secular version of this same natural law theory. Braybrooke makes a good case that there is an important idea about morality that is shared by the great philosophers in his group and that this idea is also found in Copp’s (...)
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  4. added 2015-06-02
    Accountability and Parenthood in Locke's Theological Ethics.Daniel Layman - 2014 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 31 (2):101-118.
    According to John Locke, the conditions of human happiness establish the content of natural law, but God’s commands make it morally binding. This raises two questions. First, why does moral obligation require an authority figure? Second, what gives God authority? I argue that, according to Locke, moral obligation requires an authority figure because to have an obligation is to be accountable to someone. I then argue that, according to Locke, God has a kind of parental authority inasmuch as he is (...)
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  5. added 2014-03-07
    Paterson, Craig: Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Natural Law Ethics Approach. [REVIEW]Susanna Maria Taraschi - 2010 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (3):245-247.
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  6. added 2010-03-02
    Craig Paterson - Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Natural Law Ethics Approach. [REVIEW]Glenys Williams - 2009 - King's Law Journal 20 (3):553-8.
    Extended review of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Natural Law Ethics Approach by Craig Paterson. Ashgate, 2008.
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  7. added 2010-02-27
    Review of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Natural Law Ethics Approach. [REVIEW]Craig Paterson - 2010 - Ethics and Medicine 26 (1):23-4.
    As medical technology advances and severely injured or ill people can be kept alive and functioning long beyond what was previously medically possible, the debate surrounding the ethics of end-of-life care and quality-of-life issues has grown more urgent. In this lucid and vigorous book, Craig Paterson discusses assisted suicide and euthanasia from a fully fledged but non-dogmatic secular natural law perspective. He rehabilitates and revitalises the natural law approach to moral reasoning by developing a pluralistic account of just why we (...)
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