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  1. Multiple Moving Perceptions of the Real: Arendt, Merleau-Ponty, and Truitt.Helen A. Fielding - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (3):518-534.
    This paper explores the ethical insights provided by Anne Truitt's minimalist sculptures, as viewed through the phenomenological lenses of Hannah Arendt's investigations into the co-constitution of reality and Maurice Merleau-Ponty's investigations into perception. Artworks in their material presence can lay out new ways of relating and perceiving. Truitt's works accomplish this task by revealing the interactive motion of our embodied relations and how material objects can actually help to ground our reality and hence human potentiality. Merleau-Ponty shows how our prereflective (...)
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  • Individuals and Technology: Gilbert Simondon, From Ontology to Ethics to Feminist Bioethics.Donald A. Landes - 2014 - Continental Philosophy Review 47 (2):153-176.
    Two key themes structure the work of French philosopher of science Gilbert Simondon: the processes of individuation and the nature of technical objects. Moreover, these two themes are also at the heart of contemporary debates within Ethics and Bioethics. Indeed, the question of the individual is a key concern in both Virtue Ethics and Feminist Ethics of Care, while the hyper-technical reality of the present stage of medical technology is a key reason for both the urgency for and the success (...)
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  • Examining Carceral Medicine Through Critical Phenomenology.Andrea J. Pitts - 2018 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 11 (2):14-35.
    In "Medicine and Colonialism," Frantz Fanon critically implicates several impasses that arise from the provision of medicine under contexts of colonialism. His essay offers a critical appraisal of medical care in Algeria from the perspective of a health care provider who is himself also subject to racist hierarchies of difference under French colonial rule. Drawing from his experiences as a clinician, Fanon argues that developing trusting relationships of care between patients and providers often becomes nearly impossible under conditions of colonial (...)
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