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  1. The Principle of Life in Hegel’s Philosophy.Shangwenzuo Deng - 2023 - Open Journal of Philosophy 13 (4):749-758.
    Life has a central position in Hegel’s philosophy, and its development has gone through the stages from primitive unity to finite life. In this process it appears in two forms: the first is the form of conceptual definitions about life, which mainly involves Hegel’s preexisting thoughts, and these definitions are born out of his thinking about how to overcome the subject-object split; the second is the form of the principle of life, which mainly appears in the process of constructing Hegel’s (...)
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  • Hegel on Market Laws and External Teleology.Charlotte Baumann - 2023 - Hegel Bulletin 44 (1):27-45.
    By highlighting the logico-metaphysical undergirding of Hegel's discussion of the market, this article brings to light certain proto-Marxist or proto-socialist tendencies in Hegel as well as key disagreements with Adam Smith, which have been missed by recent studies like Herzog's Inventing the Market (2013). For Smith, market laws function like an impartial arbiter that rewards honest effort; his main worry is that individuals may fail to display virtues like honesty, probity and frugality, thereby hindering the smooth functioning of the market (...)
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  • Hegel's Metaphysics and Social Philosophy. Two Readings.Charlotte Baumann - 2020 - In Paul Giladi (ed.), Hegel and the Frankfurt School. London, UK: pp. 143-166.
    While Hegel's metaphysics was long reviled, it has garnered more interest in recent years, with even the so-called non-metaphysical Hegelians starting to explicitly discuss Hegel’s metaphysical commitments. This brings up the old question: what are the social-philosophical implications of Hegel’s metaphysics? This chapter provides a unique answer to this question by contrasting the former non-metaphysical reading (as developed by Robert Pippin) with a traditional way of interpreting Hegel’s metaphysics and social philosophy, whose lineage includes not Wittgenstein, Sellars, or Brandom, but (...)
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