Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Dialectic and Dialetheism.Elena Ficara - 2013 - History and Philosophy of Logic 34 (1):35-52.
    In this article, I consider the possibility of interpreting Hegel’s dialectic as dialetheism. After a first basic recapitulation about the meaning of the words ‘dialetheism’ and ‘dialectic’ and a consideration of Priest’s own account of the relation between dialectical and dialetheic logic in 1989, I discuss some controversial issues, not directly considered by Priest. As a matter of fact, the reflection on paraconsistent logics and dialetheism has enormously grown in recent years. In addition, the reception of Hegel’s logic and metaphysics (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Paraconsistency and its Philosophical Interpretations.Eduardo Barrio & Bruno Da Re - 2018 - Australasian Journal of Logic 15 (2):151-170.
    Many authors have considered that the notions of paraconsistency and dialetheism are intrinsically connected, in many cases, to the extent of confusing both phenomena. However, paraconsistency is a formal feature of some logics that consists in invalidating the rule of explosion, whereas dialetheism is a semantical/ontological position consisting in accepting true contradictions. In this paper, we argue against this connection and show that it is perfectly possible to adopt a paraconsistent logic and reject dialetheism, and, moreover, that there are examples (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Dialetheism.Graham Priest - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    A dialetheia is a sentence, A, such that both it and its negation, A, are true (we shall talk of sentences throughout this entry; but one could run the definition in terms of propositions, statements, or whatever one takes as her favourite truth bearer: this would make little difference in the context). Assuming the fairly uncontroversial view that falsity just is the truth of negation, it can equally be claimed that a dialetheia is a sentence which is both true and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Dialetheism and the Problem of the Missing Difference.Gregory Scott Moss - 2018 - SATS 19 (2):89-110.
    Journal Name: SATS Issue: Ahead of print.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Dialetheism.Francesco Berto, Graham Priest & Zach Weber - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy 2018 (2018).
    A dialetheia is a sentence, A, such that both it and its negation, ¬A, are true (we shall talk of sentences throughout this entry; but one could run the definition in terms of propositions, statements, or whatever one takes as her favourite truth-bearer: this would make little difference in the context). Assuming the fairly uncontroversial view that falsity just is the truth of negation, it can equally be claimed that a dialetheia is a sentence which is both true and false.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations