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  1. On Nudging’s Supposed Threat to Rational Decision-Making.Timothy Houk - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (4):403-422.
    Nudging is a tool of libertarian paternalism. It involves making use of certain psychological tendencies in order to help people make better decisions without restricting their freedom. However, some have argued that nudging is objectionable because it interferes with, or undermines, the rational decision-making of the nudged agents. Opinions differ on why this is objectionable, but the underlying concerns appear to begin with nudging’s threat to rational decision-making. Those who discuss this issue do not make it clear to what this (...)
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  • Empathy, Social Media, and Directed Altruistic Living Organ Donation.Greg Moorlock & Heather Draper - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (5):289-297.
    In this article we explore some of the ethical dimensions of using social media to increase the number of living kidney donors. Social media provides a platform for changing non-identifiable ‘statistical victims’ into ‘real people’ with whom we can identify and feel empathy: the so-called ‘identifiable victim effect’, which prompts charitable action. We examine three approaches to promoting kidney donation using social media which could take advantages of the identifiable victim effect: institutionally organized campaigns based on historical cases aimed at (...)
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  • Nudging and Autonomy: Analyzing and Alleviating the Worries.Bart Engelen & Thomas Nys - 2020 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 11 (1):137-156.
    One of the most pervasive criticisms of nudges has been the claim that they violate, undermine or decrease people’s autonomy. This claim, however, is seldom backed up by an explicit and detailed conception of autonomy. In this paper, we aim to do three things. First, we want to clear up some conceptual confusion by distinguishing the different conceptions used by Cass Sunstein and his critics in order to get clear on how they conceive of autonomy. Second, we want to add (...)
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  • Counter-Manipulation and Health Promotion.T. M. Wilkinson - 2017 - Public Health Ethics 10 (3):257-266.
    It is generally wrong to manipulate. One leading reason is because manipulation interferes with autonomy, in particular the component of autonomy called ‘independence’, that is, freedom from intentional control by others. Manipulative health promotion would therefore seem wrong. However, manipulative techniques could be used to counter-manipulation, for example, playing on male fears of impotence to counter ‘smoking is sexy’ advertisements. What difference does it make to the ethics of manipulation when it is counter-manipulation? This article distinguishes two powerful defences of (...)
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  • Analysis of the Paternalistic Justification of an Agenda Setting Public Health Policy: The Case of Tobacco Plain Packaging.Thomas Boysen Anker - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (2):208-228.
    This article analyses the paternalistic justification of the world’s first mandatory tobacco plain packaging policy, which came into force in Australia in 2012. The policy is setting international precedence, with a range of developed and developing countries planning and implementing similar policies. Understanding the paternalistic dimension of the policy is therefore of imminent international importance. The policy meets important ethical benchmarks such as respect for citizens’ self-interests and protection of others against harm. However, plain packaging faces a number of ethical (...)
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  • Addressing Vaccine Hesitancy Requires an Ethically Consistent Health Strategy.Laura Williamson & Hannah Glaab - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):84.
    Vaccine hesitancy is a growing threat to public health. The reasons are complex but linked inextricably to a lack of trust in vaccines, expertise and traditional sources of authority. Efforts to increase immunization uptake in children in many countries that have seen a fall in vaccination rates are two-fold: addressing hesitancy by improving healthcare professional-parent exchange and information provision in the clinic; and, secondly, public health strategies that can override parental concerns and values with coercive measures such as mandatory and (...)
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  • Ethical Criteria for Health-Promoting Nudges: A Case-by-Case Analysis.Bart Engelen - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (5):48-59.
    Health-promoting nudges have been put into practice by different agents, in different contexts and with different aims. This article formulates a set of criteria that enables a thorough ethical evaluation of such nudges. As such, it bridges the gap between the abstract, theoretical debates among academics and the actual behavioral interventions being implemented in practice. The criteria are derived from arguments against nudges, which allegedly disrespect nudgees, as these would impose values on nudgees and/or violate their rationality and autonomy. Instead (...)
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  • The Ethics of Organ Donor Registration Policies: Nudges and Respect for Autonomy.Douglas MacKay & Alexandra Robinson - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (11):3-12.
    Governments must determine the legal procedures by which their residents are registered, or can register, as organ donors. Provided that governments recognize that people have a right to determine what happens to their organs after they die, there are four feasible options to choose from: opt-in, opt-out, mandated active choice, and voluntary active choice. We investigate the ethics of these policies' use of nudges to affect organ donor registration rates. We argue that the use of nudges in this context is (...)
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  • Autonomy by Default.Cass R. Sunstein - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (11):1-2.
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  • Nudges, Autonomy, and Organ Donor Registration Policies: Response to Critics.Douglas MacKay - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (2):W4 - W8.
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  • Beyond Influence and Autonomy: Expanding the Scope of Ethical Considerations in Organ Donation Registration.Jeffrey Kirby - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (11):31-33.
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  • “Nudging” Deceased Donation Through an Opt-Out System: A Libertarian Approach or Manipulation?David Rodrıguez-Arias & Myfanwy Morgan - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (11):25-28.
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  • On Nudging and Informed Consent—Four Key Undefended Premises.J. S. Swindell Blumenthal-Barby - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (6):31 - 33.
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  • Nudge or Grudge? Choice Architecture and Parental Decision‐Making.Jennifer Blumenthal-Barby & Douglas J. Opel - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (2):33-39.
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  • Ethical Persuasion: The Rhetoric of Communication in Critical Care.Alex Dubov - 2015 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21 (3):496-502.
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