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  1. Modern Synthesis is the Light of Microbial Genomics.Austin Booth, Carlos Mariscal & W. Ford Doolittle - 2016 - Annual Reviews of Microbiology 70 (1):279-297.
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  • Mass Extinctions as Major Transitions.Adrian Currie - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (2):29.
    Both paleobiology and investigations of ‘major evolutionary transitions’ are intimately concerned with the macroevolutionary shape of life. It is surprising, then, how little studies of major transitions are informed by paleontological perspectives and. I argue that this disconnect is partially justified because paleobiological investigation is typically ‘phenomena-led’, while investigations of major transitions are ‘theory-led’. The distinction turns on evidential relevance: in the former case, evidence is relevant in virtue of its relationship to some phenomena or hypotheses concerning those phenomena; in (...)
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  • Molecular Organisms.Maureen A. O’Malley - 2016 - Biology and Philosophy 31 (4):571-589.
    Protistology, and evolutionary protistology in particular, is experiencing a golden research era. It is an extended one that can be dated back to the 1970s, which is when the molecular rebirth of microbial phylogeny began in earnest. John Archibald, a professor of evolutionary microbiology at Dalhousie University, focuses on the beautiful story of endosymbiosis in his book, John Archibald, One Plus One Equals One: Symbiosis and the Origin of Complex Life. However, this historical narrative could be treated as synecdochal of (...)
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  • Some Like It Hot: A Hypothesis for Establishment of the Proto-Mitochondrial Endosymbiont During Eukaryogenesis.Cory D. Dunn - 2017 - Journal of Molecular Evolution 85.
    Available evidence suggests that two prokaryotes, an archaeon and a bacterium, collaborated in the eventual formation of nucleated cells with arguably increased complexity of form and function. However, the mechanisms by which bacteria and archaea cooperated in the formation of eukaryotes, and the selective pressures that promoted this partnership, remain a mystery. Mitochondria are eukaryotic organelles thought to be derived from respiring, alpha-proteobacterial endosymbionts capable of generating ATP by oxidative phosphorylation. The earliest eukaryote likely harbored mitochondria, since all characterized eukaryotic (...)
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