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  1. Engendering Harm: A Critique of Sex Selection For “Family Balancing”.Arianne Shahvisi - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (1):123-137.
    The most benign rationale for sex selection is deemed to be “family balancing.” On this view, provided the sex distribution of an existing offspring group is “unbalanced,” one may legitimately use reproductive technologies to select the sex of the next child. I present four novel concerns with granting “family balancing” as a justification for sex selection: families or family subsets should not be subject to medicalization; sex selection for “family balancing” entrenches heteronormativity, inflicting harm in at least three specific ways; (...)
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  • Sex Selection: Some Ethical And Policy Considerations. [REVIEW]Eike-Henner W. Kluge - 2007 - Health Care Analysis 15 (2):73-89.
    Sex selection, which refers to the attempt to choose or control the sex of a child prior to its birth, has become the subject of increasing ethical scrutiny and many jurisdictions have criminalized it except for serious sex-linked diseases or conditions that cannot easily be ameliorated or remedied. This paper argues that such a blanket prohibition is ethically unwarranted because it is based on a flawed understanding of the difference between sexist values and mere sex-oriented preferences. It distinguishes between ethics (...)
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  • Accounting for the Moral Significance of Technology: Revisiting the Case of Non-Medical Sex Selection.Olya Kudina - forthcoming - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    This article explores the moral significance of technology, reviewing a microfluidic chip for sperm sorting and its use for non-medical sex selection. I explore how a specific material setting of this new iteration of pre-pregnancy sex selection technology—with a promised low cost, non-invasive nature and possibility to use at home—fosters new and exacerbates existing ethical concerns. I compare this new technology with the existing sex selection methods of sperm sorting and Prenatal Genetic Diagnosis. Current ethical and political debates on emerging (...)
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