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  1. “The Angel of the House” in the Realm of ART: Feminist Approach to Oocyte and Spare Embryo Donation for Research. [REVIEW]Anna Alichniewicz & Monika Michalowska - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (1):123-129.
    The spectacular progress in assisted reproduction technology that has been witnessed for the past thirty years resulted in emerging new ethical dilemmas as well as the revision of some perennial ones. The paper aims at a feminist approach to oocyte and spare embryo donation for research. First, referring to different concepts of autonomy and informed consent, we discuss whether the decision to donate oocyte/embryo can truly be an autonomous choice of a female patient. Secondly, we argue the commonly adopted language (...)
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  • What Constitutes a Reasonable Compensation for Non-Commercial Oocyte Donors: An Analogy with Living Organ Donation and Medical Research Participation.Emy Kool, Rieke van der Graaf, Annelies Bos, Bartholomeus Fauser & Annelien Bredenoord - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (11):736-741.
    There is a growing consensus that the offer of a reasonable compensation for oocyte donation for reproductive treatment is acceptable if it does not compromise voluntary and altruistically motivated donation. However, how to translate this ‘reasonable compensation’ in practice remains unclear as compensation rates offered to oocyte donors between different European Union countries vary significantly. Clinics involved in oocyte donation, as well as those in other medical contexts, might be encouraged in calculating a more consistent and transparent compensation for donors (...)
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  • On Bioethics and the Commodified Body: An Interview with Donna Dickenson.Donna Dickenson & Alana Cattapan - 2016 - Studies in Social Justice 10 (2):342-351.
    Interview on the commodified body with Donna Dickenson by Alana Cattapan.
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  • Is the Creation of Admixed Embryos “an Offense Against Human Dignity”?David Jones - 2010 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 16 (1):87-114.
    The controversy over the creation of admixed human- nonhuman embryos, and specifically of what have been termed “cybrids,” involves a range of ethical and political issues. It is not reducible to a single question. This paper focuses on one question raised by that controversy, whether creating admixed human-nonhuman entities is “an offense against human dignity.” In the last decade there has been sustained criticism of the use of the concept of human dignity within bioethics. The concept has been criticized as (...)
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  • Attitudes Towards the Donation of Human Embryos for Stem Cell Research Among Chinese IVF Patients and Students.Achim Rosemann & Huiyu Luo - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (3):441-457.
    Bioethical debates on the use of human embryos and oocytes for stem cell research have often been criticized for the lack of empirical insights into the perceptions and experiences of the women and couples who are asked to donate these tissues in the IVF clinic. Empirical studies that have investigated the attitudes of IVF patients and citizens on the donation of their embryos and oocytes have been scarce and have focused predominantly on the situation in Europe and Australia. This article (...)
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  • The Lady Vanishes: What’s Missing From the Stem Cell Debate.Donna L. Dickenson - 2006 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (1-2):43-54.
    Most opponents of somatic cell nuclear transfer and embryonic stem cell technologies base their arguments on the twin assertions that the embryo is either a human being or a potential human being, and that it is wrong to destroy a human being or potential human being in order to produce stem cell lines. Proponents’ justifications of stem cell research are more varied, but not enough to escape the charge of obsession with the status of the embryo. What unites the two (...)
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  • Animal Eggs for Stem Cell Research: A Path Not Worth Taking.Françoise Baylis - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (12):18-32.
    In January 2008, the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority issued two 1-year licenses for cytoplasmic hybrid embryo research. This article situates the HFEA's decision in its wider scientific and political context in which, until quite recently, the debate about human embryonic stem cell research has focused narrowly on the moral status of the developing human embryo. Next, ethical arguments against crossing species boundaries with humans are canvassed. Finally, a new argument about the risks of harm to women egg providers resulting (...)
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  • Informed Consent and Fresh Egg Donation for Stem Cell Research: Incorporating Embodied Knowledge Into Ethical Decision-Making.Katherine Carroll & Catherine Waldby - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):29-39.
    This article develops a model of informed consent for fresh oöcyte donation for stem cell research, during in vitro fertilisation (IVF), by building on the importance of patients’ embodied experience. Informed consent typically focuses on the disclosure of material information. Yet this approach does not incorporate the embodied knowledge that patients acquire through lived experience. Drawing on interview data from 35 patients and health professionals in an IVF clinic in Australia, our study demonstrates the uncertainty of IVF treatment, and the (...)
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  • The Force of Dissimilar Analogies in Bioethics.Heidi Mertes & Guido Pennings - 2011 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (2):117-128.
    Although analogical reasoning has long been a popular method of reasoning in bioethics, current literature does not sufficiently grasp its variety. We assert that the main shortcoming is the fact that an analogy's value is often judged on the extent of similarity between the source situation and the target situation, while in (bio)ethics, analogies are often used because of certain dissimilarities rather than in spite of them. We make a clear distinction between dissimilarities that aim to reinforce a similar approach (...)
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  • Oversight Framework Over Oocyte Procurement for Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer: Comparative Analysis of the Hwang Woo Suk Case Under South Korean Bioethics Law and U.S. Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research.Mi-Kyung Kim - 2009 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (5):367-384.
    We examine whether the current regulatory regime instituted in South Korea and the United States would have prevented Hwang’s potential transgressions in oocyte procurement for somatic cell nuclear transfer, we compare the general aspects and oversight framework of the Bioethics and Biosafety Act in South Korea and the US National Academies’ Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research, and apply the relevant provisions and recommendations to each transgression. We conclude that the Act would institute centralized oversight under governmental auspices while (...)
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  • The Commercialization of Human Eggs in Mitochondrial Replacement Research.Donna L. Dickenson - 2013 - The New Bioethics 19 (1):18-29.
    After the commercialisation of induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) in 2007, the pressure to commercialise women's eggs for stem cell research could have been expected to lessen. However, the pressure to harvest human eggs in large quantities for research has not diminished; rather, it has taken different directions, for example, in germline mitochondrial research. Yet there has been little acknowledgement of these technologies' need for human eggs, the possible risks to women and the ethical issues concerning potential exploitation. Rather, there (...)
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  • The Other Woman: Evaluating the Language of ‘Three Parent’ Embryos.D. A. Jones - 2015 - Clinical Ethics 10 (4):97-106.
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