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  1. Earthing Technology.Vincent Blok - 2017 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology (2/3).
    In this article, we reflect on the conditions under which new technologies emerge in the Anthropocene and raise the question of how to conceptualize sustainable technologies therein. To this end, we explore an eco-centric approach to technology development, called biomimicry. We discuss opposing views on biomimetic technologies, ranging from a still anthropocentric orientation focusing on human management and control of Earth’s life-support systems, to a real eco-centric concept of nature, found in the responsive conativity of nature. This concept provides the (...)
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  • Appraising Asymmetries: Considerations on the Changing Relation between Human Existence and Planetary Nature—Guest Editors’ Introduction.Jochem Zwier, Vincent Blok & Pieter Lemmens - 2018 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (6):635-644.
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  • The elephant in the room: The biomimetic principle in bio-robotics and embodied AI.Marco Tamborini - 2023 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 97 (C):13-19.
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  • Philosophie der Bionik: Das Komponieren von bio-robotischen Formen.Marco Tamborini - 2023 - Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 71 (1):30-51.
    In this paper, I explore how bio-hybrid forms can be created and combined starting from organic forms. The thesis put forward is epistemological: the combinatorial practice of bionics, biomimetics, biorobotics, and all design strategies inspired by nature is not based on a kind of biomimetic inspiration, i. e., on a kind of imitation of nature, but on a practice of translation. To develop this thesis, I focus on the practices of contemporary biorobotics, first examining the practice of translating natural forms (...)
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  • ‘From there everything changed’: conversion narrative in the biomimicry movement.Fransina Stradling & Valerie Hobbs - forthcoming - Critical Discourse Studies.
    1. ‘Born into a world of stories’ (Bochner et al., 1997), humans share a propensity to experience and understand the world through narratives. We use narratives to situate ourselves physiologically...
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  • Biomimicry in Agriculture: Is the Ecological System-Design Model the Future Agricultural Paradigm?Milutin Stojanovic - 2019 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 32 (5):789-804.
    Comprising almost a third of greenhouse gas emissions and having an equally prominent role in pollution of soils, fresh water, coastal ecosystems, and food chains in general, agriculture is, alongside industry and electricity/heat production, one of the three biggest anthropogenic causes of breaching the planetary boundaries. Most of the problems in agriculture, like soil degradation and diminishing biodiversity, are caused by unfit uses of existing technologies and approaches mimicking the agriculturally-relevant functioning natural ecosystems seem necessary for appropriate organization of our (...)
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  • Biomimicry in Agriculture: Is the Ecological System-Design Model the Future Agricultural Paradigm?Milutin Stojanovic - 2019 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 32 (5):789-804.
    Comprising almost a third of greenhouse gas emissions and having an equally prominent role in pollution of soils, fresh water, coastal ecosystems, and food chains in general, agriculture is, alongside industry and electricity/heat production, one of the three biggest anthropogenic causes of breaching the planetary boundaries. Most of the problems in agriculture, like soil degradation and diminishing biodiversity, are caused by unfit uses of existing technologies and approaches mimicking the agriculturally-relevant functioning natural ecosystems seem necessary for appropriate organization of our (...)
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  • Toward a Terrestrial Turn in Philosophy of Technology.Pieter Lemmens, Vincent Blok & Jochem Zwier - 2017 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 21 (2/3):114-126.
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  • Finance, Nature and Ontology.Glen Lehman & Chris Mortensen - 2019 - Topoi 40 (4):715-724.
    The paper examines connections between ontology and finance. The ontological debates concerning the role of finance are examined between two opposing schools of thought that can be labelled, very broadly, ‘instrumentalist’ and ‘realist’. These two schools of thought have had momentous repercussions in understanding what is a good society. Each school defines Nature in particular ways which can be explored using ontology and philosophical insight. Our theoretical investigation aims to accommodate Nature in community financial deliberations. A positive role for government (...)
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  • Hybrids and the Boundaries of Moral Considerability or Revisiting the Idea of Non-Instrumental Value.Magdalena Holy-Luczaj & Vincent Blok - 2019 - Philosophy and Technology 34 (2):223-242.
    The transgressive ontological character of hybrids—entities crossing the ontological binarism of naturalness and artificiality, e.g., biomimetic projects—calls for pondering the question of their ethical status, since metaphysical and moral ideas are often inextricably linked. The example of it is the concept of “moral considerability” and related to it the idea of “intrinsic value” understood as a non-instrumentality of a being. Such an approach excludes hybrids from moral considerations due to their instrumental character. In the paper, we revisit the boundaries of (...)
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  • Hybrids and the Boundaries of Moral Considerability or Revisiting the Idea of Non-Instrumental Value.Magdalena Holy-Luczaj & Vincent Blok - 2019 - Philosophy and Technology 34 (2):223-242.
    The transgressive ontological character of hybrids—entities crossing the ontological binarism of naturalness and artificiality, e.g., biomimetic projects—calls for pondering the question of their ethical status, since metaphysical and moral ideas are often inextricably linked. The example of it is the concept of “moral considerability” and related to it the idea of “intrinsic value” understood as a non-instrumentality of a being. Such an approach excludes hybrids from moral considerations due to their instrumental character. In the paper, we revisit the boundaries of (...)
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  • Environmental Ethics and Biomimetic Ethics: Nature as Object of Ethics and Nature as Source of Ethics.Henry Dicks - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (2):255-274.
    While the contemporary biomimicry movement is associated primarily with the idea of taking Nature as model for technological innovation, it also contains a normative or ethical principle—Nature as measure—that may be treated in relative isolation from the better known principle of Nature as model. Drawing on discussions of the principle of Nature as measure put forward by Benyus and Jackson, while at the same time situating these discussions in relation to contemporary debates in the philosophy of biomimicry : 364–387, 2011; (...)
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  • Can Imitating Nature Save the Planet?Henry Dicks & Vincent Blok - 2019 - Environmental Values 28 (5):519-526.
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  • What Does it Mean to Mimic Nature? A Typology for Biomimetic Design.Alessio Gerola, Zoë Robaey & Vincent Blok - 2023 - Philosophy and Technology 36 (4):1-20.
    In an effort to produce new and more sustainable technologies, designers have turned to nature in search of inspiration and innovation. Biomimetic design (from the Greek bios, life, mimesis, imitation) is the conscious imitation of biological models to solve today's technical and ecological challenges. Nowadays numerous different approaches exist that take inspiration from nature as a model for design, such as biomimicry, biomimetics, bionics, permaculture, ecological engineering, etc. This variety of practices comes in turn with a wide range of different (...)
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  • Agricultural technologies as living machines: toward a biomimetic conceptualization of technology.V. Blok & H. G. J. Gremmen - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (2):246-263.
    Smart Farming Technologies raise ethical issues associated with the increased corporatization and industrialization of the agricultural sector. We explore the concept of biomimicry to conceptualize smart farming technologies as ecological innovations which are embedded in and in accordance with the natural environment. Such a biomimetic approach of smart farming technologies takes advantage of its potential to mitigate climate change, while at the same time avoiding the ethical issues related to the industrialization of the agricultural sector. We explore six principles of (...)
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  • Technology as Mimesis: Biomimicry as Regenerative Sustainable Design, Engineering, and Technology.Vincent Blok - 2022 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 26 (3):426-446.
    In this article, we investigate how to explain the difference between traditional design, engineering, and technology—which have exploited nature and put increasing pressure on Earth’s carrying capacity since the industrial revolution—and biomimetic design—which claims to explore nature’s sustainable solutions and promises to be regenerative by design. We reflect on the concept of mimesis. Mimesis assumes a continuity between the natural environment as a regenerative model and measure for sustainable design that is imitated and reproduced in biomimetic design, engineering, and technology. (...)
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