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  1. Dialectic and Logic in Aristotle and His Tradition.Matthew Duncombe & Catarina Dutilh Novaes - 2016 - History and Philosophy of Logic 37 (1):1-8.
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  • On the Role of Logic in Analytic Theology: Exploring the Wider Context of Beall’s Philosophy of Logic.A. J. Cotnoir - 2019 - Journal of Analytic Theology 7 (1):508-528.
    What is the proper role of logic in analytic theology? This question is thrown into sharp relief when a basic logical principle is questioned, as in Beall’s ‘Christ – A Contradiction.’ Analytic philosophers of logic have debated between exceptionalism and anti-exceptionalism, with the tide shifting towards anti-exceptionalism in recent years. By contrast, analytic theologians have largely been exceptionalists. The aim of this paper is to argue for an anti-exceptionalist view, specifically treating logic as a modelling tool. Along the way I (...)
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  • Complete Symposium on Jc Beall's Christ – A Contradiction: A Defense of Contradictory Christology.Jc Beall, Timothy Pawl, Thomas McCall, A. J. Cotnoir & Sara L. Uckelman - 2019 - Journal of Analytic Theology 7 (1):400-577.
    The fundamental problem of Christology is the apparent contradiction of Christ as recorded at Chalcedon. Christ is human and Christ is divine. Being divine entails being immutable. Being human entails being mutable. Were Christ two different persons there’d be no apparent contradiction. But Chalcedon rules as much out. Were Christ only partly human or only partly divine there’d be no apparent contradiction. But Chalcedon rules as much out. Were the very meaning of ‘mutable’ and/or ‘immutable’ other than what they are, (...)
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  • La Nécessité du Mouvement Éternel. Note Exégétique À Aristote, Physique VIII, 5, 256b8-13.Luca Gili & Laurence Godin-Tremblay - 2020 - Dialogue 59 (4):725-740.
    RÉSUMÉEn Physique VIII, 5, 256b8-13, Aristote soutient qu'il est impossible qu'il n'y ait pas de mouvement, parce qu'il a démontré auparavant qu'il est nécessaire qu'il y ait toujours du mouvement. En effet, en Physique VIII, 1, 251b23-28, Aristote avait dit qu'il est nécessaire que si le temps est éternel, le mouvement le soit aussi. En Physique VIII, 5, 256b8-13, Aristote introduit en revanche la nécessité du mouvement éternel de sensu diviso. Dans cette note, nous montrons que l'argument de Physique VIII, (...)
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  • Reasoning Biases, Non‐Monotonic Logics and Belief Revision.Catarina Dutilh Novaes & Herman Veluwenkamp - 2016 - Theoria 82 (4):29-52.
    A range of formal models of human reasoning have been proposed in a number of fields such as philosophy, logic, artificial intelligence, computer science, psychology, cognitive science, etc.: various logics, probabilistic systems, belief revision systems, neural networks, among others. Now, it seems reasonable to require that formal models of human reasoning be empirically adequate if they are to be viewed as models of the phenomena in question. How are formal models of human reasoning typically put to empirical test? One way (...)
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  • Aristotle on the Non-Cause Fallacy.Luca Castagnoli - 2016 - History and Philosophy of Logic 37 (1):9-32.
    When in classical formal logic the notions of deduction, valid inference and logical consequence are defined, causal language plays no role. The founder of western logic, Aristotle, identified ‘non-cause’, or ‘positing as cause what is not a cause’, as a logical fallacy. I argue that a systematic re-examination of Aristotle's analysis of NCF, and the related language of logical causality, in the Sophistical Refutations, Topics, Analytics and Rhetoric, helps us to understand his conception of. It reveals that Aristotle's syllogismhood is (...)
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  • Proof, Knowledge, and Scepticism: Essays in Ancient Philosophy III By Jonathan Barnes Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014, Pp. 720, £85, HB ISBN: 9780199577538. [REVIEW]Tamer Nawar - 2015 - Philosophy 90 (3):539-544.
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  • Paradoxes and Structural Rules From a Dialogical Perspective.Catarina Dutilh Novaes & Rohan French - 2018 - Philosophical Issues 28 (1):129-158.
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  • Reasoning Biases, Non‐Monotonic Logics and Belief Revision.Catarina Dutilh Novaes & Herman Veluwenkamp - 2017 - Theoria 83 (1):29-52.
    A range of formal models of human reasoning have been proposed in a number of fields such as philosophy, logic, artificial intelligence, computer science, psychology, cognitive science, etc.: various logics, probabilistic systems, belief revision systems, neural networks, among others. Now, it seems reasonable to require that formal models of human reasoning be empirically adequate if they are to be viewed as models of the phenomena in question. How are formal models of human reasoning typically put to empirical test? One way (...)
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