Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Aging 4.0? Rethinking the ethical framing of technology-assisted eldercare.Mark Schweda & Silke Schicktanz - 2021 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 43 (3):1-19.
    Technological approaches are increasingly discussed as a solution for the provision of support in activities of daily living as well as in medical and nursing care for older people. The development and implementation of such assistive technologies for eldercare raise manifold ethical, legal, and social questions. The discussion of these questions is influenced by theoretical perspectives and approaches from medical and nursing ethics, especially the principlist framework of autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. Tying in with previous criticism, the present contribution (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The End of Dependence? Ethical Issues in the Adoption of Assistive Technologies: An Introduction.Katherine Wayne* - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (3):167-171.
    This special issue explores the evolving role of assistive technology in health and medicine, with 3 original articles and 5 commentaries. The following introduction provides an overview of the issue’s unifying themes and the articles’ aims and concerns, as well as reflection on some critical points for discussion raised in the commentaries. Assistive technology finds itself at a pivotal point of development and integration into current systems, where sound and innovative ethical guidance is crucial. With this issue we hope to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Can Norman Daniels Help You Get a Wheelchair? A Commentary on Durocher et al.Mary Yvonne Egan - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (3):192-195.
    Durocher and colleagues argue that Norman Daniels’s notion of just health could provide a useful framework for decreasing inequities in access to assistive technology. I argue that it would provide limited help for two reasons. First, Daniels’s reliance on normal species functioning as the goal of health care and his assumptions regarding the impact of normal species functioning on reasonable life projects create substantial difficulties for application to assistive technology. Second, although Daniels’s requirements for distributive justice provide a critical starting (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • What Justifies the Allocation of Health Care Resources to Patients with Disorders of Consciousness?Andrew Peterson, Sean Aas & David Wasserman - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 12 (2-3):127-139.
    This paper critically engages ethical issues in the allocation of novel, and potentially costly, health care resources to patients with disorders of consciousness. First, we review potential benefits of novel health care resources for patients and their families and outline preliminary considerations to address concerns about cost. We then address two problems regarding the allocation of health care resources to patients with disorders of consciousness: (1) the problem of uncertain moral status; and (2) the problem of accurately measuring the welfare (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Access to Assistive Technology, Systems Thinking, and Market Shaping: A Response to Durocher et al.Malcolm MacLachlan - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (3):196-200.
    Fairness of access to assistive technology is important for its allocation on an equitable basis and for broader social justice and rights issues. Although the use of Daniels’s notion of “justice as fair opportunity” is helpful to the context of assistive technology, other aspects of Daniels’s broader conceptualisation of “just health” are not appropriate in this context. It is argued that fairness of access to assistive technology is crucial for the equitable attainment of the sustainable development goals; however, such access (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The right to assistive technology.Joseph A. Stramondo - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (5):247-271.
    In this paper, I argue that disabled people have a right to assistive technology, but this right cannot be grounded simply in a broader right to health care or in a more comprehensive view like the capabilities approach to justice. Both of these options are plagued by issues that I refer to as the problem of constriction, where the theory does not justify enough of the AT that disabled people should have access to, and the problem of overextension, where the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation