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  1. Expanding the Romantic Circle.Tena Thau - 2020 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 23 (5):915-929.
    Our romantic lives are influenced, to a large extent, by our perceptions of physical attractiveness – and the societal beauty standards that shape them. But what if we could free our desires from this fixation on looks? Science fiction writer Ted Chiang has explored this possibility in a fascinating short story – and scientific developments might, in the future, move it beyond the realm of fiction. In this paper, I lay out the prudential case for using “attraction-expanding technology,” and then (...)
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  • Unfit for the Future? The Depoliticization of Human Perfectibility, From the Enlightenment to Transhumanism.Nicolas Le Dévédec - 2018 - European Journal of Social Theory 21 (4):488-507.
    An intellectual and cultural movement advocating a radical enhancement of human performance via technoscientific and biomedical advances, transhumanism has grown in notoriety in recent years. Grouping engineers, philosophers, sociologists, and entrepreneurs, the movement and its ideals of enhanced humans have a strong social resonance, be it doping in sport, the use of smart drugs, or the biomedical battle against aging. This article sheds theoretical and critical light on transhumanism through the lens of human perfectibility. It particularly aims to show how (...)
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  • Neuroenhancement.Alexandre Erler & Cynthia Forlini - 2020 - Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy Online.
    Entry on "Neuroenhancement" in the Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy Online.
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  • Moral Neuroenhancement.Brian D. Earp, Thomas Douglas & Julian Savulescu - 2017 - In L. Syd M. Johnson & Karen S. Rommelfanger (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Neuroethics. Routledge.
    In this chapter, we introduce the notion of “moral neuroenhancement,” offering a novel definition as well as spelling out three conditions under which we expect that such neuroenhancement would be most likely to be permissible (or even desirable). Furthermore, we draw a distinction between first-order moral capacities, which we suggest are less promising targets for neurointervention, and second-order moral capacities, which we suggest are more promising. We conclude by discussing concerns that moral neuroenhancement might restrict freedom or otherwise “misfire,” and (...)
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  • Addressing Polarisation in Science.Brian D. Earp - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (9):782-784.
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  • When is Diminishment a Form of Enhancement? : Rethinking the Enhancement Debate in Biomedical Ethics.Brian D. Earp, Anders Sandberg, Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu - unknown
    The enhancement debate in neuroscience and biomedical ethics tends to focus on the augmentation of certain capacities or functions: memory, learning, attention, and the like. Typically, the point of contention is whether these augmentative enhancements should be considered permissible for individuals with no particular “medical” disadvantage along any of the dimensions of interest. Less frequently addressed in the literature, however, is the fact that sometimes the _diminishment_ of a capacity or function, under the right set of circumstances, could plausibly contribute (...)
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  • Transhumanismo y neuroeducación en perspectiva orteguiana.Javier Gracia-Calandín - 2020 - Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, España] 53:55-64.
    Este artículo incide en la significatividad de los fines de la educación y la importancia vital de los deseos. Frente a las pretensiones de una tecnología a merced del mercado de las promesas transhumanistas, se retoma la pedagogía del cascabel de Ortega y la importancia de cultivar deseos ascendentes, que no tienen su fundamento en la técnica sino en la vida humana. El artículo concluye con una defensa del compromiso ético-cívico de una genuina educación humanista radicada en el sentimiento moral (...)
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  • Stop Wishing. Start Doing!Alberto Giubilini - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (1):29-31.
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  • Enhancements 2.0: Self-Creation Might Not Be as Lovely as Some Think.Mirko Garasic - 2019 - Topoi 38 (1):135-140.
    Recent developments in the study of our brain and neurochemical maps have sparked much enthusiasm in some scholars, making room for speculations over the possibility to shape our morality from within ourselves rather than through [failed] socio-political projects. This paper aims at criticising the prospected scenario put forward by some scholars supporting a specific version of Moral Enhancement as an overly optimistically described manipulative tools. To do so, I will focus on a specific version of Moral Enhancers, namely Emotional Enhancers. (...)
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  • Anti-Love Biotechnology: Was It Not Better to Have Loved and Lost Than Never to Have Loved at All?Mirko D. Garasic - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):22-23.
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  • The Quantified Relationship.John Danaher, Sven Nyholm & Brian D. Earp - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (2):3-19.
    The growth of self-tracking and personal surveillance has given rise to the Quantified Self movement. Members of this movement seek to enhance their personal well-being, productivity, and self-actualization through the tracking and gamification of personal data. The technologies that make this possible can also track and gamify aspects of our interpersonal, romantic relationships. Several authors have begun to challenge the ethical and normative implications of this development. In this article, we build upon this work to provide a detailed ethical analysis (...)
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  • Are Gay and Lesbian People Fading Into the History of Bioethics?Timothy F. Murphy - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (5):s6-s11.
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  • Female Genital Mutilation and Male Circumcision: Toward an Autonomy-Based Ethical Framework.Brian Earp - forthcoming - Medicolegal and Bioethics:89.
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  • Should We Biochemically Enhance Sexual Fidelity?Robbie Arrell - 2018 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 83:389-414.
    In certain corners of the moral enhancement debate, it has been suggested we ought to consider the prospect of supplementing conventional methods of enhancing sexual fidelity (e.g. relationship counselling, moral education, self-betterment, etc.) with biochemical fidelity enhancement methods. In surveying this argument, I begin from the conviction that generally-speaking moral enhancement ought to expectably attenuate (or at least not exacerbate) vulnerability. Assuming conventional methods of enhancing sexual fidelity are at least partially effective in this respect – e.g., that relationship counselling (...)
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  • The Medicalization of Love.Brian D. Earp, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu - 2015 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 24 (3):323-336.
    Pharmaceuticals or other emerging technologies could be used to enhance (or diminish) feelings of lust, attraction, and attachment in adult romantic partnerships. While such interventions could conceivably be used to promote individual (and couple) well-being, their widespread development and/or adoption might lead to “medicalization” of human love and heartache—for some, a source of serious concern. In this essay, we argue that the “medicalization of love” need not necessarily be problematic, on balance, but could plausibly be expected to have either good (...)
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  • Psychedelic Moral Enhancement.Brian D. Earp - 2018 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 83:415-439.
    The moral enhancement debate seems stuck in a dilemma. On the one hand, the more radical proposals, while certainly novel and interesting, seem unlikely to be feasible in practice, or if technically feasible then most likely imprudent. But on the other hand, the more sensible proposals – sensible in the sense of being both practically achievable and more plausibly ethically justifiable – can be rather hard to distinguish from both traditional forms of moral enhancement, such as non-drug-mediated social or moral (...)
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  • The Medicalization of Love.Brian D. Earp, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (4):759-771.
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  • Amantes Sunt Amentes: Pathologizing Love and the Meaning of Suffering.Diana Aurenque & Christopher W. McDougall - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):34-36.
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  • The Vice of In-Principlism and the Harmfulness of Love.John Danaher - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):19-21.
    This is a response to Earp and colleagues' target article "If I could just stop loving you: Anti-love biotechnology and the ethics of a chemical break-up". I argue that the authors may indulge in the vice of in-principlism when presenting their ethical framework for dealing with anti-love biotechnology, and that they mis-apply the concept of harm.
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  • Involuntary Exposures to Love-Enhancing or Anti-Love Agents.Gary E. Marchant & Yvonne A. Stevens - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):26-27.
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  • Anti-Love or Anti-“Lifestyle”: Historical Reflections on Reparative Therapies for Homosexuality.Lance Wahlert - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):36-38.
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  • When Love Hurts Children: Controlling the Feelings of Minors.M. Carmela Epright & Sara Waller - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):28-29.
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  • A Thomistic Account of Anti-Love Biotechnology.Brandon Boesch - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):30-31.
    Applies a generally Thomistic framework to Earp and colleagues' (2013) discussion of anti-love biotechnology. Discusses some of the constraints that should be placed on the use of such a technology from a Thomistic perspective.
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  • An Error Theory of Biotechnology and the Ethics of Chemical Breakups: It Is the Reasons, Not the Pharmaceuticals, That Are Important in Defending Against Perilous Love.Gavin Enck - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):32-34.
    In this commentary, I offer an account of an error theory of biotechnology and apply it to Brian D. Earp, Olga A. Wudarczyk,Anders Sandberg, and Julian Savulescu’s (2013)ethical framework for chemical reakups.
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  • The Heart Outright: A Comment on “If I Could Just Stop Loving You”.Neil McArthur - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):24-25.
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  • Anti-Love Biotechnologies: Integrating Considerations of the Social.Kristina Gupta - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):18-19.
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  • The Difficult Case of Voluntariness as Autonomy in Anti-Love Biotechnology.Hywote Taye - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):1-2.
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  • A Responsibility to Chemically Help Patients with Relationships and Love?Gavin G. Enck & Jeanna Ford - 2015 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 24 (4):493-496.
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  • On Love, Ethics, Technology, and Neuroenhancement.David Ferraro - 2015 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 24 (4):486-489.
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  • Unrequited Love Hurts.Francesca Minerva - 2015 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 24 (4):479-485.
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  • Normality, Therapy, and Enhancement.Alberto Giubilini - 2015 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 24 (3):347-354.
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  • The Medicalization of Love and Narrow and Broad Conceptions of Human Well-Being.Sven Nyholm - 2015 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 24 (3):337-346.
    Would a “medicalization” of love be a “good” or “bad” form of medicalization? In discussing this question, Earp, Sandberg, and Savulescu primarily focus on the potential positive and negative consequences of turning love into a medical issue. But it can also be asked whether there is something intrinsically regrettable about medicalizing love. It is argued here that the medicalization of love can be seen as an “evaluative category mistake”: it treats a core human value as if it were mainly a (...)
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  • Sexual Reorientation in Ideal and Non‐Ideal Theory.Candice Delmas & Sean Aas - 2018 - Journal of Political Philosophy 26 (4):463-485.
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  • The Ethics of Human Enhancement.Alberto Giubilini & Sagar Sanyal - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (4):233-243.
    Ethical debate surrounding human enhancement, especially by biotechnological means, has burgeoned since the turn of the century. Issues discussed include whether specific types of enhancement are permissible or even obligatory, whether they are likely to produce a net good for individuals and for society, and whether there is something intrinsically wrong in playing God with human nature. We characterize the main camps on the issue, identifying three main positions: permissive, restrictive and conservative positions. We present the major sub-debates and lines (...)
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  • Moving Beyond Concerns of Autonomy.Gavin G. Enck - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (4):26-28.
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  • Brave New Love: The Threat of High-Tech “Conversion” Therapy and the Bio-Oppression of Sexual Minorities.Brian D. Earp, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 5 (1):4-12.
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