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  1. Critical phenomenology and psychiatry.Dan Zahavi & Sophie Loidolt - 2021 - Continental Philosophy Review 55 (1):55-75.
    Whereas classical Critical Theory has tended to view phenomenology as inherently uncritical, the recent upsurge of what has become known as critical phenomenology has attempted to show that phenomenological concepts and methods can be used in critical analyses of social and political issues. A recent landmark publication, 50 Concepts for Critical Phenomenology, contains no reference to psychiatry and psychopathology, however. This is an unfortunate omission, since the tradition of phenomenological psychiatry—as we will demonstrate in the present article by surveying and (...)
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  • An Introduction to Engaged Phenomenology.Jessica Stanier - 2022 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 53 (3):226-242.
    In this article, I introduce engaged phenomenology as an approach through which phenomenologists can more explicitly and critically consider the generative conditions and implications of their rese...
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  • Introduction to the Special Issue, People on Streets. Critical Phenomenologies of Embodied Resistance.Maria Robaszkiewicz & Marieke Borren - 2023 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 55 (1):5-11.
    The last few years have seen the emergence of critical phenomenology as an exciting paradigm in phenomenology and beyond, spanning disciplines such as anthropology, urban studies, gender studies an...
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  • An ecological approach to affective injustice.Joel Krueger - 2023 - Philosophical Topics 51 (1):85-111.
    There is growing philosophical interest in “affective injustice”: injustice faced by individuals specifically in their capacity as affective beings. Current debates tend to focus on affective injustice at the psychological level. In this paper, I argue that the built environment can be a vehicle for affective injustice — specifically, what Wildman et al. (2022) term “affective powerlessness”. I use resources from ecological psychology to develop this claim. I consider two cases where certain kinds of bodies are, either intentionally or unintentionally, (...)
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