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Postmodernism and the Environmental Crisis

London: Routledge (1995)

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  1. Discourse and Wolves: Science, Society, and Ethics.William S. Lynn - 2010 - Society and Animals 18 (1):75-92.
    Wolves have a special resonance in many human cultures. To appreciate fully the wide variety of views on wolves, we must attend to the scientific, social, and ethical discourses that frame our understanding of wolves themselves, as well as their relationships with people and the natural world. These discourses are a configuration of ideas, language, actions, and institutions that enable or constrain our individual and collective agency with respect to wolves. Scientific discourse is frequently privileged when it comes to wolves, (...)
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  • Narratives and the Ethics and Politics of Environmentalism: The Transformative Power of Stories.Arran Gare - 2001 - Theory and Science 2 (1):1-10.
    By revealing the centrality of stories to action, to social life and to inquiry together with the implicit assumptions in polyphonic stories about the nature of humans, of life and of physical reality, this paper examines the potential of stories to transform civilization. Focussing on the failure of environmentalists so far in the face of the global ecological crisis, it is shown how ethics and political philosophy could be reconceived and radical ecology reformulated and reinvigorated by appreciating and exploiting the (...)
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  • Grand Narratives, Metamodernism, and Global Ethics.Andrew J. Corsa - 2018 - Cosmos and History 14 (3):241-272.
    Some philosophers contend that to effectively address problems such our global environmental crisis, humans must collectively embrace a polyphonic, environmentalist grand narrative, very different from the narratives accepted by modernists. Cultural theorists who write about metamodernism likewise discuss the recent return to a belief in narratives, and contend that our society’s current approach to narratives is very different from that of the modernists. In this paper, I articulate these philosophers’ and cultural theorists’ positions, and I highlight and explore interconnections between (...)
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  • Religious World‐View and Environment in the Sertão of North‐East Brazil.Scott William Hoefle - 1999 - Philosophy and Geography 2 (1):55 – 79.
    The importance of religious cosmology for environmental ethics is explored in a case-study of enchanted and disenchanted world-views in the Sert o of North-east Brazil. Popular Catholicism is shown to have retained an enchanted world-view of humans interacting with saints, souls and animist spirits. In order to differentiate themselves from Catholics, evangelical Protestants pursue a disenchanted view of the natural environment but hold a highly supernatural view of human society. Afro-Brazilian cult members are Catholics who graft an enchanted view of (...)
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  • Not Easy Being Green: Process, Poetry and the Tyranny of Distance.Damon A. Young - 2002 - Ethics, Place and Environment 5 (3):189 – 204.
    There are many places that we must save from destruction. Sadly, they are mostly distant from us. If we accept Heidegger's notion of Being-in-the-World, this distance means that we cannot authentically speak of their Being. Even if we 'dwell' in our own lands, we are not 'at home' in these beautiful places. However, if we cannot speak of their Being, of what 'is', how can we ask logging and mining multinationals to stop destroying them? This speechlessness may be overcome with (...)
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  • Contested Moralities: Animals and Moral Value in the Dear/Symanski Debate.William S. Lynn - 1998 - Ethics, Place and Environment 1 (2):223-242.
    Geography is experiencing a 'moral turn' in its research interests and practices. There is also a flourishing interest in animal geographies that intersects this turn, and is concurrent with wider scholarly efforts to reincorporate animals and nature” into our ethical and social theories. This article intervenes in a dispute between Michael Dear and Richard Symanski. The dispute is over the culling of wild horses in Australia, and I intervene to explore how geography deepens our moral understanding of the animallhuman dialectic. (...)
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  • Power and Narrative in Day-to-Day Consuming.Kevin Taft - unknown
    In this dissertation I address the question, how does power operate in day-today consuming in a consumer society? My theoretical framework has two bases. One base is Foucault's theories of power, including but not limited to his work on normalization, surveillance, examination, confession, and identity. The other base is narrative theory, including the relevance of narratives to personal and social identities, the role of narratives in creating social order, the impact of narratives on such things as the organization of space (...)
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  • Religious World-View and Environment in the Sertão of North-East Brazil.Scott William Hoefle - 1999 - Ethics, Place and Environment 2 (1):55-79.
    The importance of religious cosmology for environmental ethics is explored in a case-study of enchanted and disenchanted world-views in the Sertão of North-east Brazil. Popular Catholicism is shown to have retained an enchanted world-view of humans interacting with saints, souls and animist spirits. In order to differentiate themselves from Catholics, evangelical Protestants pursue a disenchanted view of the natural environment but hold a highly supernatural view of human society. Afro-Brazilian cult members are Catholics who graft an enchanted view of human (...)
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  • Being Grateful for Being: Being, Reverence and Finitude.Damon A. Young - 2005 - Sophia 44 (2):31-53.
    Atheists are rarely associated with holiness, yet they can have deeply spiritual experiences. Once such experience of the author exemplified ‘the holy’ as defined by Otto. However, the subjectivism of Otto’s Kantianism undermines Otto’s otherwise fruitful approach. While the work of Hegel overcomes this, it is too rationalistic to account for mortal life. Seeking to avoid these shortcomings, this paper places ‘holiness’ within a self-differentiating ontological unity, the Heideggerian ‘fourfold’. This unity can only be experienced by confronting groundless finite mortality, (...)
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  • The Return of the Grand Metanarratives of Progress.Raymond Aaron Younis, Damien Broderick & Kim Humphery - 1997 - Metascience 6 (1):49-62.
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  • Ecology and Machinic Thought: Nietzsche, Deleuze, Guattari.Mark Halsey - 2005 - Angelaki 10 (3):33 – 55.
    Not man as the king of creation, but rather as the being who is in intimate contact with the profound life of all forms or all types of beings, who is responsible for even the stars and animal life, and who ceaselessly plugs an organ-machine into an energy-machine, a tree into his body, a breast into his mouth, the sun into his asshole: the eternal custodian of the machines of the universe. Deleuze and Guattari, Anti-Oedipus 4.
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  • Who Drew the Sky? Conflicting Assumptions in Environmental Education.Andrew Stables - 2001 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 33 (2):245–256.
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  • Environmental Education: Arguing the Case for Multiple Approaches.William Scott - 1999 - Educational Studies 25 (1):89-97.
    This paper develops existing arguments about the need to rethink ways in which environmental education is conceptualised, interpreted and enacted by schools, teachers and students working within their communities. In doing this, it critiques what it sees as the narrowing and constraining influence that socially critical theory has exerted over the field, and calls for multiple approaches, carefully and communally deliberated on, in order to deliver the (environmental) educational goals deemed appropriate and necessary by schools and communities. Such an approach, (...)
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  • Global Visions and Common Ground: Biodemocracy, Postmodern Pressures, and the Earth Charter.Heather Eaton - 2014 - Zygon 49 (4):917-937.
    The theme of this article is a rise in notions of a planetary community, and the tensions this evokes in global-local and universal-contextual debates. The primary focus is the realization that new visions are needed to respond to ecological dilemmas in a culturally diverse yet global world and interconnected Earth. Of the many ways to discuss this, I first consider the growing interest in and expansion of biodemocracy as a way to combine these dimensions. Insights and issues from postmodern perspectives (...)
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