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  1. Feminism, Postmodernism, and Psychological Research.Lisa Cosgrove - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (3):85-112.
    Drawing primarily from the work of Julia Kristeva and Judith Butler, the author suggests that a postmodern approach to identity can be used to challenge the essentialism that pervades both feminist empiricism and standpoint theory, and thus move feminist psychology in a more emancipatory direction. A major premise of this paper is that an engagement with postmodernism redirects our attention to symbolic constructions of femininity and to the sociopolitical grounding of experience.
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  • A Spectrum of Relational Autonomy, Illustrated Using the Case Studies of Female Suicide Bombers.Herjeet Marway - unknown
    When women become perpetrators of suicide bombing, their agency – their ability to act upon and affect the world – is often denied. There are a number of reasons for this and one this thesis considers is that – as females – they are not expected to be violent. Accordingly, such women are judged to be coerced or incompetent, and so unable to rule themselves sufficiently as agents. Models of autonomy propose various frameworks for assessing whether acts or persons are (...)
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  • After Mr. Nowhere: What Kind of Proper Self for a Scientist?Sandra Harding - 2015 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 1 (1):1-22.
    The conventional proper scientific self has an ethical obligation to strive to see everywhere in the universe from no particular location in that universe: he is to produce the view from nowhere. What different conceptions of the proper scientific self are created by the distinctive assumptions and research practices of social justice movements, such as feminism, anti-racism, and post-colonialism? Three such new ideals are: the multiple and conflicted knowing self; the researcher strategically located inside her research world; and the community (...)
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  • Personal Autonomy or the Deconstructed Subject? A Reply to Hekman.Diana T. Meyers - 1992 - Hypatia 7 (1):124-132.
    A response to Susan Hekman's article "Reconstituting the Subject: Feminism, Modernism, and Postmodernism" and to her review of Diana T. Meyers' book Self, Society, and Personal Choice both of which appeared in Hypatia 6.
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  • Feminism, Postmodernism, and Psychological Research.Lisa Cosgrove - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (3):85-112.
    Drawing primarily from the work of Julia Kristeva and Judith Butler, the author suggests that a postmodern approach to identity can be used to challenge the essentialism that pervades both feminist empiricism and standpoint theory, and thus move feminist psychology in a more emancipatory direction. A major premise of this paper is that an engagement with postmodernism redirects our attention to symbolic constructions of femininity and to the sociopolitical grounding of experience.
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  • Self-Trust, Autonomy, and Self-Esteem.Trudy Govier - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (1):99 - 120.
    Self-trust is a necessary condition of personal autonomy and self-respect. Self-trust involves a positive sense of the motivations and competence of the trusted person; a willingness to depend on him or her; and an acceptance of vulnerability. It does not preclude trust in others. A person may be rightly said to have too much self-trust; however core self-trust is essential for functioning as an autonomous human being.
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