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  1. Francesco Patrizi’s Two Books on Space: Geometry, Mathematics, and Dialectic Beyond Aristotelian Science.Amos Edelheit - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (3):243-257.
    Francesco Patrizi was a competent Greek scholar, a mathematician, and a Neoplatonic thinker, well known for his sharp critique of Aristotle and the Aristotelian tradition. In this article I shall present, in the first part, the importance of the concept of a three-dimensional space which is regarded as a body, as opposed to the Aristotelian two-dimensional space or interval, in Patrizi’s discussion of physical space. This point, I shall argue, is an essential part of Patrizi’s overall critique of Aristotelian science, (...)
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  • ‘Exploding’ Immaterial Substances: Margaret Cavendish’s Vitalist-Materialist Critique of Spirits.Emma Wilkins - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (5):858-877.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper, I explore Margaret Cavendish’s engagement with mid-seventeenth-century debates on spirits and spiritual activity in the world, especially the problems of incorporeal substance and magnetism. I argue that between 1664 and 1668, Cavendish developed an increasingly robust form of materialism in response to the deficiencies which she identified in alternative philosophical systems – principally mechanical philosophy and vitalism. This was an intriguing direction of travel, given the intensification in attacks on the supposedly atheistic materialism of Hobbes. While some (...)
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  • The Philosophical Systems of Francesco Patrizi and Henry More.Jacques Joseph - 2019 - Intellectual History Review 29 (4):595-617.
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  • Francesco Patrizi’s Concept of “Nature”: Presence and Refutation of Stoicism.Thomas Leinkauf - 2019 - Intellectual History Review 29 (4):575-593.
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  • Essay Review: Henry More and Newton's Gravity, Henry More: Magic, Religion and ExperimentHenry More: Magic, Religion and Experiment. HallA. Rupert . Pp. Xii + 304. £30.00.John Henry - 1993 - History of Science 31 (1):83-97.
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  • A Note on Francesco Patrizi's Use of Cleomedes.Robert B. Todd - 1982 - Annals of Science 39 (3):311-314.
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  • By Ye Divine Arm: God and Substance in De Gravitatione.Hylarie Kochiras - 2013 - Religious Studies 49 (3):327-356.
    This article interprets Newton's De gravitatione as presenting a reductive account of substance, on which divine and created substances are identified with their characteristic attributes, which are present in space. God is identical to the divine power to create, and mind to its characteristic power. Even bodies lack parts outside parts, for they are not constructed from regions of actual space, as some commentators suppose, but rather consist in powers alone, maintained in certain configurations by the divine will. This interpretation (...)
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  • Francesco Patrizi.Fred Purnell - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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