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  1. Caring in Confucian Philosophy.Ann A. Pang-White - 2011 - Philosophy Compass 6 (6):374-384.
    This article examines the intersections of Confucian philosophy and feminist ethics of care. It explains the origins and contribution of care ethics to modern ethical discourse and the controversy that surrounds this ethical theory. The article discusses the emergence of comparative research on the compatibility (or incompatibility) of Confucian ren and feminist care. It first explores the question whether it is philosophically feasible to disassociate Confucian ren from its historical context by deploying it for contemporary feminist debates, especially considering that, (...)
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  • Do Filial Values Corrupt? How Can We Know? Clarifying and Assessing the Recent Confucian Debate.Hagop Sarkissian - 2020 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 19 (2):193-207.
    In a number of papers, Liu Qingping has critiqued Confucianism’s commitment to “consanguineous affection” or filial values, claiming it to be excessive and indefensible. Many have taken issue with his textual readings and interpretive claims, but these responses do little to undermine the force of his central claim that filial values cause widespread corruption in Chinese society. This is not an interpretive claim but an empirical one. If true, it merits serious consideration. But is it true? How can we know? (...)
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  • Confucian Family for a Feminist Future.Ranjoo Seodu Herr - 2012 - Asian Philosophy 22 (4):327-346.
    The Confucian family, not only in its historical manifestations but also in the imagination of the Confucian founders, was the locus of misogynist norms and practices that have subjugated women in varying degrees. Therefore, advancing women’s well-being and equality in East Asia may seem to require radically transforming the Confucian family to approximate alternative ideal conceptions of the family in the West. This article opposes such a stance by arguing that (1) Western conceptions of the family may be neither plausible (...)
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  • Relations as the Aim of Education in Joseon Neo-Confucianism: The Case of the Five Relationships.Keumjoong Hwang & David Samuel Meyer - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (9):936-948.
    This article attempts to explain through the lens of the Five Relationships the meaning of Joseon neo-Confucian view which emphasized relationship development as the aim and contents of education. In neo-Confucianism, education is the task of guiding learners in cultivating and unfolding capabilities in the relationships of everyday life. Within the context of neo-Confucianism, the development of competency in relationships was another expression of the educational goal of actualizing the ‘original nature’ including of the four virtues. Understanding the nature of (...)
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  • Confucian Ethics and Care Ethics: The Political Dimension of a Scholarly Debate.Chenyang Li - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (4):897-903.
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  • Care Ethics and Confucianism: Caring Through Li.Kelly M. Epley - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (4):881-896.
    The role of li, or ritual, in Confucianism is a perceived impediment to interpreting Confucianism to share a similar ethical framework with care ethics because care ethics is a form of moral particularism. I argue that this perception is false. The form of moral particularism promoted by care ethicists does not entail the abandonment of social conventions such as li. On the contrary, providing good care often requires employing systems of readily recognizable norms in order to ensure that care is (...)
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  • Setting the Record Straight: Confucius' Notion of Ren. [REVIEW]Shirong Luo - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (1):39-52.
    Abstract Comparative studies involving early Confucian ethics often appear to assume that it is a unified approach to morality. This essay challenges that assumption by arguing that Confucius had a significantly different conception of ren , commonly viewed as central to Confucian ethics, from that of Mencius. It is generally accepted that ren has two senses: in a narrow sense, it is the virtue of benevolence (or compassion); in a broad sense, it is the all-encompassing ethical ideal. Both senses fail (...)
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  • Bullying in the U.S. Workplace: Normative and Process-Oriented Ethical Approaches.Helen LaVan & Wm Marty Martin - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (2):147-165.
    Bullying is a serious problem in today’s workplace, in that, a large percentage of employees have either been bullied or knows someone who has. There are a variety of ethical concerns dealing with bullying—that is, courses of action to manage the bullying contain serious ethical/legal concerns. The inadequacies of legal protections for bullying in the U.S. workplace also compound the approaches available to deal ethically with bullying. While Schumann (2001, Human Resource Management Review 11, 93–111) does not explicitly examine bullying, (...)
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  • Early Confucianism is a System for Social-Functional Influence and Probably Does Not Represent a Normative Ethical Theory.Ryan Nichols - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (4):499-520.
    To the question “What normative ethical theory does early Confucianism best represent?” researchers in the history of early Confucian philosophy respond with more than half a dozen different answers. They include sentimentalism, amoralism, pragmatism, Kantianism, Aristotelian virtue theory, care ethics, and role ethics. The lack of consensus is concerning, as three considerations make clear. First, fully trained, often leading, scholars advocate each of the theories. Second, nearly all participants in the debate believe that the central feature of early Confucianism is (...)
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  • Relational Care Ethics From a Comparative Perspective: The Ethics of Care and Confucian Ethics.Yoshimi Wada - 2014 - Ethics and Social Welfare 8 (4):350-363.
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