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  1. Ritual Forms and Ritual Stuff: Implications of Lawson and McCauley's Ritual Form Hypothesis for Material Culture.Ryan G. Hornbeck & Justin L. Barrett - 2020 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 48 (1):129-146.
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  • Confucianism and the Liturgy: An Analectical Argument for the High Church Traditions.Joseph Blado & Tyler Dalton McNabb - 2020 - TheoLogica: An International Journal for Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology 4 (1).
    In Confucian thought, there exists a functional view of rituals in which the participation in ritualistic practices brings about human flourishing. Call this the Confucian Ritual Principle (CRP). Utilizing contemporary psychology, in this paper, we argue for CRP. After linking rituals to human flourishing, we argue that on the hypothesis that Christianity is true, we would expect God to establish highly ritualistic and dogmatic liturgies. Put slightly differently, we argue that we should expect what we call 'high church' on the (...)
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  • Joint Action Enhances Cohesion and Positive Affect, but Suppresses Aspects of Creativity When Combined With Shared Goals.Reneeta Mogan, Joseph Bulbulia & Ronald Fischer - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Rituals, Repetitiveness and Cognitive Load.Johannes Alfons Karl & Ronald Fischer - 2018 - Human Nature 29 (4):418-441.
    A central hypothesis to account for the ubiquity of rituals across cultures is their supposed anxiolytic effects: rituals being maintained because they reduce existential anxiety and uncertainty. We aimed to test the anxiolytic effects of rituals by investigating two possible underlying mechanisms for it: cognitive load and repetitive movement. In our pre-registered experiment, 180 undergraduates took part in either a stress or a control condition and were subsequently assigned to either control, cognitive load, undirected movement, a combination of undirected movement (...)
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