Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Natural Duty of Justice in Non-Ideal Circumstances: On the Moral Demands of Institution Building and Reform.Laura Valentini - 2017 - European Journal of Political Theory.
    Principles of distributive justice bind macro-level institutional agents, like the state. But what does justice require in non-ideal circumstances, where institutional agents are unjust or do not exist in the first place? Many answer by invoking Rawls's natural duty ‘to further just arrangements not yet established’, treating it as a ‘normative bridge’ between institutional demands of distributive justice and individual responsibilities in non-ideal circumstances. I argue that this response strategy is unsuccessful. I show that the more unjust the status quo (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • On Life, Death, and Abortion.D. W. Haslett - 1996 - Utilitas 8 (2):159.
    Morally speaking, is abortion murder? This is what I am calling the ‘abortion problem’. I claim that neither pro-life nor pro-choice advocates have the correct solution; that the correct solution is instead one considered correct by relatively few people. But if this solution really is correct, then why, after years of intense debate, is this solution not more widely accepted? Many, no doubt, are precluded from accepting it by religious dogma. But others, I think, fail to arrive at a correct (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Rag-Bags, Disputes and Moral Pluralism.Berys Gaut - 1999 - Utilitas 11 (1):37.
    Moral pluralism of the kind associated with W. D. Ross is the doctrine that there is a plurality of moral principles, which in their application to particular cases can conflict, and that there is no further principle to determine which of these principles takes priority in cases of conflict. Two objections are commonly advanced against this kind of pluralism: that it proposes a rag-bag of moral principles lacking a unifying basis; and that it offers no way to adjudicate moral disputes (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Practice Consequentialism: A New Twist on an Old Theory.S. Jack Odell - 2001 - Utilitas 13 (1):86.
    In this paper I defend a version of consequentialism that is neither of the act nor the rule variety. I argue that most, if not all, acceptable moral rules are formulations of intricate and interrelated practices that serve to promote harmonious co-existence between human beings; that these formulations are shorthand abbreviations of the lengthy formulations which would be required to actually describe the extremely complicated set of prescriptions and prohibitions which comprise our ethical practices; that we are culturally, perhaps even (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • How Much is Rule-Consequentialism Really Willing to Give Up to Save the Future of Humanity?Patrick Kaczmarek - 2017 - Utilitas 29 (2):239-249.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Multiple-Act Consequentialism.Joseph Mendola - 2006 - Noûs 40 (3):395–427.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • A Philosophical Argument Against Evidence-Based Policy.Rani Lill Anjum & Stephen D. Mumford - 2017 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 23 (5):1045-1050.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Anthropocentrism in Climate Ethics and Policy.Katie McShane - 2016 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 40 (1):189-204.
    Most ethicists agree that at least some nonhumans have interests that are of direct moral importance. Yet with very few exceptions, both climate ethics and climate policy have operated as though only human interests should be considered in formulating and evaluating climate policy. In this paper I argue that the anthropocentrism of current climate ethics and policy cannot be justified. I first describe the ethical claims upon which my analysis rests, arguing that they are no longer controversial within contemporary ethics. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark