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  1. What do players do in a game? A Habermasian perspective.Xiaolin Zhang, Emily Ryall & Andrew Edgar - 2023 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 50 (3):311-328.
    By adopting Habermas’ communicative theory, this paper categorizes players’ actions into four elements. The strategic action involves players manipulating each other within the framework of a gameFootnote1; normative action is manifested in following the rules and the underlying ethos; dramaturgical action emerges through the players’ deliberate presentation of themselves to both participants and spectators; and communicative action reveals the purpose of a game as a way of being. The conceptualization of game actions leads to a qualitative redefinition of the perfect (...)
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  • Continuity and Discontinuity of Sport and Exercise Type During the COVID-19 Pandemic. An Exploratory Study of Effects on Mood.Noora J. Ronkainen, Arto J. Pesola, Olli Tikkanen & Ralf Brand - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Involvement in sport and exercise not only provides participants with health benefits but can be an important aspect of living a meaningful life. The COVID-19 pandemic and the temporary cessation of public life in March/April/May 2020 came with restrictions, which probably also made it difficult, if not impossible, to participate in certain types of sport or exercise. Following the philosophical position that different types of sport and exercise offer different ways of “relating to the world,” this study explored continuity in (...)
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  • Into the glidescape: an outline of gliding sports from the perspective of applied phenomenology.Sigmund Loland & Åsa Bäckström - 2023 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 50 (3):365-382.
    There is an absence in the literature on sports of a conceptualization of what in French are labeled sports de glisse: sports that imply gliding on water, through air, and on snow and ice, such as surfing, paragliding, skiing, and skating. Inspired by Ingold’s (1993) concept of the taskscape, we introduce the idea of the glidescape: a perceptual field in which gliding sports practitioners inhabit, create, and transform their environment while at the same time being recreated and transformed themselves. Using (...)
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  • Nature Sports.Kevin J. Krein - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (2):193-208.
    Sports such as surfing, mountaineering, and backcountry skiing are often grouped together. But what exactly it is that they share, and the implications of their common characteristics, have not been explained clearly. I refer to such sports as ‘nature sports’ and argue that they share a fundamental structure in which human beings and features of the natural world are brought together. The principal claim I make is that nature sports are those sports in which a particular natural feature, or combination (...)
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  • Nature Sports.Kevin J. Krein - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (2):193-208.
    Sports such as surfing, mountaineering, and backcountry skiing are often grouped together. But what exactly it is that they share, and the implications of their common characteristics, have not been explained clearly. I refer to such sports as ‘nature sports’ and argue that they share a fundamental structure in which human beings and features of the natural world are brought together. The principal claim I make is that nature sports are those sports in which a particular natural feature, or combination (...)
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  • Book Symposium: Kevin Krein’s Philosophy and Nature Sports.Kevin Krein, Jim Parry, Irena Martínková, Gunnar Breivik & Rebekah Humphreys - 2022 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 17 (2):240-274.
    This is a book symposium on Kevin Krein’s Philosophy and Nature Sports. Gunnar Breivik, Jim Parry and Irena Martínková, and Rebekah Humphreys provide critical commentary on the text. The critical comments are followed by a response from Krein. The discussion covers a broad range of topics. These include the definition of “sport,” comparisons between nature sports and friluftsliv, the role of risk in nature sports, the experience of flow and the sublime in nature sports, and the understanding of nature. Krein (...)
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  • ‘I can’t outrun a bear, but I can outrun you:’ sport contests, nature challenge activities and outdoor recreation.Brian Komyathy - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 18 (2):244-258.
    The old adage has two people out hiking who run into a bear. One starts running while the other asks ‘why are you running? You can’t outrun a bear’. To which the other responds, ‘I don’t have to outrun the bear. I only have to outrun you’. Hiking/trekking is not typically a competitive endeavor characterized by contests but, like many endeavors/pursuits/activities, competition can be injected into it; thereby sportifying it. Swimming is a sport (under certain conditions). At the same time, (...)
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  • Football: the philosophy behind the game: by Stephen Mumford, Cambridge, UK, Polity Press, 2019, 140 pp., $45.00 (Cloth), $12.95 (paperback), ISBN: 978-1-5095-3531-6; ISBN: 978-1-5095-3532-3. [REVIEW]Adam Kadlac - 2020 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 47 (1):146-150.
    Volume 47, Issue 1, March 2020, Page 146-150.
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  • Freeride skiing – the values of freedom and creativity.Jusa Impiö & Jim Parry - forthcoming - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport:1-17.
    Freeride skiing is the fastest-growing sector of the skiing industry, but there are no studies analyzing its nature and values. First, we provide descriptions of freeride skiing and competitive freeride skiing, trying to analyzing the nature of these activities in comparison and contrast with conceptions of traditional sport and nature sport. Whilst freeride skiing must be seen in some sense as a nature sport, competitive freeride skiing is best seen within the category of traditional sport. However, these ‘new’ sports raise (...)
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  • Philosophy and Nature Sports: by Kevin Krein, New York, Routledge, 2019, 174pp., $112 (hardback), ISBN 9781138210851. [REVIEW]Leslie A. Howe - 2020 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 47 (1):142-146.
    Volume 47, Issue 1, March 2020, Page 142-146.
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  • On not being alone in lonely places: preferences, goods, and aesthetic-ethical conflict in nature sports.Leslie A. Howe - forthcoming - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport:1-14.
    Ethical questions normally arise in sport because its participants are human moral agents and because its practice community entails the observance of rules and responsibilities that humans generally owe one another in a social practice of voluntary competition. Since nature sports are not defined by this kind of inter-agential activity, it would appear that there are no comparable ethical constraints on their pursuit. This paper considers conflicts of preference versus right between humans, how these are resolved, and whether these rights (...)
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  • Not everything is a contest: sport, nature sport, and friluftsliv.Leslie A. Howe - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (3):437-453.
    Two prevalent assumptions in the philosophy of sport literature are that all sports are games and that all games are contests, meant to determine who is the better at the skills definitive of the sport. If these are correct, it would follow that all sports are contests and that a range of sporting activities, including nature sports, are not in fact sports at all. This paper first confronts the notion that sport and games must seek to resolve skill superiority through (...)
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  • Intensity and the Sublime: Paying Attention to Self and Environment in Nature Sports.Leslie A. Howe - 2019 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 13 (1):94-106.
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  • Intensity and the Sublime: Paying Attention to Self and Environment in Nature Sports.Leslie A. Howe - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 13 (1):1-13.
    This paper responds to Kevin Krein’s claim in that the particular value of nature sports over traditional ones is that they offer intensity of sport experience in dynamic interaction between an athlete and natural features. He denies that this intensity is derived from competitive conflict of individuals and denies that nature sport derives its value from internal conflict within the athlete who carries out the activity. This paper responds directly to Krein by analysing ‘intensity’ in sport in terms of the (...)
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  • Just doing what I do: on the awareness of fluent agency.James M. Dow - 2017 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 16 (1):155-177.
    Hubert Dreyfus has argued that cases of absorbed bodily coping show that there is no room for self-awareness in flow experiences of experts. In this paper, I argue against Dreyfus’ maxim of vanishing self-awareness by suggesting that awareness of agency is present in expert bodily action. First, I discuss the phenomenon of absorbed bodily coping by discussing flow experiences involved in expert bodily action: merging into the flow; immersion in the flow; emergence out of flow. I argue against the claim (...)
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  • What would a deep ecological sport look like? The example of Arne Naess.Gunnar Breivik - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (1):63-81.
    ABSTRACTSince the 1960s environmental problems have increasingly been on the agenda in Western countries. Global warming and climate change have increased concerns among scientists, politicians and the general population. While both elite sport and mass sport are part of the consumer culture that leads to ecological problems, sport philosophers, with few exceptions, have not discussed what an ecologically acceptable sport would look like. My goal in this article is to present a radical model of ecological sport based on Arne Naess’s (...)
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  • The Sporting Exploration of the World; Toward a Fundamental Ontology of the Sporting Human Being.Gunnar Breivik - 2019 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 14 (2):146-162.
    My perspective in this paper is to look at sport and other physical activities as a way of exploring and experimenting with the environing world. The human being is basically the homo movens – born...
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  • The role of risk in nature sports.Gunnar Breivik - forthcoming - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport:1-14.
    In this article, I will examine the role of risk in the risky nature sports. Risky nature sports are identified as nature sports where participants may reckon with the possibility of severe injury or death if things go wrong. The first part of the article identifies some evolutionary, historical, and conceptual characteristics of nature sports and risk. In the second part of the article, I discuss the concept of risk and its meaning in risky nature sports. Additionally, I address questions (...)
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  • ‘Richness in Ends, Simpleness in Means!’ on Arne Naess’s Version of Deep Ecological Friluftsliv and Its Implications for Outdoor Activities.Gunnar Breivik - 2020 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 15 (3):417-434.
    The increasing global warming and the loss of biodiversity should concern us all. Some feel that outdoor activities, which take place in natural surroundings, should have a special obligation to ch...
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  • Two concepts of sporting excellence.Steffen Borge - forthcoming - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport:1-14.
    This paper deals with the question of whether nature sports are to be counted among the (traditional) sports and Kevin Krein’s recent argument, based on sporting excellence, as to why they should. Krein argues that sports as such are ultimately about sporting excellence and because both so-called traditional sports and nature sports fulfil that criterion, nature sports belong in the sport domain. Here, I show that Krein’s argument rests on an equivocation between two concepts of sporting excellence. Sporting excellence in (...)
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  • The power of nature (sports)? From anthropocentrism to ecocentrism.Douglas Booth - forthcoming - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport:1-17.
    Nature sports include pursuits such as paragliding, white-water kayaking, free diving, mountaineering, and surfing. Participants in nature sports interact with geographical features (e.g. mountains, rivers, oceans, snow fields, ice sheets, caves, rock faces) as well as the dynamic forces that produce them (e.g. gravity, waves, thermal currents, flowing water, wind, rain, sun). In this article, I engage a representational approach to analyze how participants in nature sports interact with nature. Anthropocentric representations privilege participants’ interests, wants, desires, and ends; they typically (...)
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