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  1. Express Yourself: The Value of Theatricality in Soccer.Kenneth Aggerholm - 2013 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 40 (2):205 - 224.
    The purpose of this paper is to study the expressive part of game performance in soccer by introducing the concept of theatricality to describe a special form of expression. The aim is to contribute to the understanding of game performance by looking into the appearance, role and value of theatricality. The main argument of the paper is that theatricality can describe an important, but rarely noticed performance aspect, as it provides a unifying concept for expressive distancing in four dimensions of (...)
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  • On Competing Against Oneself, or 'I Need to Get a Different Voice in My Head'.Leslie A. Howe - 2008 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 2 (3):353 – 366.
    In a recent paper, Kevin Krein argues that the notion of self-competition is misplaced in adventure sports and of only limited application altogether, for two main reasons: (i) the need for a consistent and repeatable measure of performance; and (ii) the requirement of multiple competitors. Moreover, where an individual is engaged in a sport in which the primary feature with which they are engaged is a natural one, Krein argues that the more accurate description of their activity is not 'competition', (...)
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  • Ludonarrative Dissonance and Dominant Narratives.Leslie A. Howe - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):44-54.
    This paper explores ludonarrative dissonance as it occurs in sport, primarily as the conflict experienced by participants between dominant narratives and self-generated interpretations of embodied experience. Taking self-narrative as a social rather than isolated production, the interaction with three basic categories of dominant narrative is explored: transformative, representing a spectrum from revelatory to distorting, bullying and colonising. These forms of dominant narrative prescribe interpretations of the player’s experience of play and of self that displace their own, with the end result (...)
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  • Convention, Audience, and Narrative: Which Play is the Thing?Leslie A. Howe - 2011 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 38 (2):135-148.
    This paper argues against the conception of sport as theatre. Theatre and sport share the characteristic that play is set in a conventionally-defined hypothetical reality, but they differ fundamentally in the relative importance of audience and the narrative point of view. Both present potential for participants for development of selfhood through play and its personal possibilities. But sport is not essentially tied to audience as is theatre. Moreover, conceptualising sport as a form of theatre valorises the spectator’s narrative as normative (...)
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  • Gender Roles Roll.Pam R. Sailors - 2013 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 7 (2):245-258.
    Roller derby, once known for scripted theatricality that made it more like a stage play than a sport, has reinvented itself as a legitimate athletic endeavour. Since its rebirth as the Women's Flat Track Derby Association in the early 2000s, it has experienced exponential growth, from 30 flat track derby leagues in 2005 to more than 450 leagues in 2010. This translates to more than 15,000 skaters worldwide. Roller derby provides a unique case of a women's sport that is not (...)
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