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  1. Consequentializing and its Consequences.S. Schroeder - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (6):1475-1497.
    Recently, a number of philosophers have argued that we can and should “consequentialize” non-consequentialist moral theories, putting them into a consequentialist framework. I argue that these philosophers, usually treated as a group, in fact offer three separate arguments, two of which are incompatible. I show that none represent significant threats to a committed non-consequentialist, and that the literature has suffered due to a failure to distinguish these arguments. I conclude by showing that the failure of the consequentializers’ arguments has implications (...)
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  • On the Problematic Link Between Fundamental Ethics and Economic Policy Recommendations.Olof Johansson-Stenman - 1998 - Journal of Economic Methodology 5 (2):263-297.
    This paper provides a systematic survey of major simplifying assumptions that economists make, and often have to make, in order to obtain a useful theory for policy recommendations in practice. The aim is to consider the whole chain of assumptions with an emphasis on such simplifications that economists sometimes tend to ignore (at worst), or at best often tend not to take very seriously. The paper concludes that the link from fundamental ethics to economic policy recommendations is often very fragile, (...)
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  • LW Sumner. The Hateful and the Obscene: Studies in the Limits of Free Expression. Toronto University of Toronto Press 2004. Pp. Xi+ 275. [REVIEW]Roger A. Shiner - 2005 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 35 (4):641-666.
    At a 1990 conference on freedom of expression Wayne Sumner presented a paper arguing that there were good reasons to grant Canada’s hate propaganda law constitutional protection under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Fourteen years on he has repudiated the same thesis at much greater length in this meticulously researched, beautifully written, and exhaustively argued book. The book was a finalist for the 2005 Donner Prize, a prestigious book prize for a non-fiction work on Canadian public policy. The (...)
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  • In Defence of Bad Science and Irrational Policies: An Alternative Account of the Precautionary Principle.Stephen John - 2010 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (1):3-18.
    In the first part of the paper, three objections to the precautionary principle are outlined: the principle requires some account of how to balance risks of significant harms; the principle focuses on action and ignores the costs of inaction; and the principle threatens epistemic anarchy. I argue that these objections may overlook two distinctive features of precautionary thought: a suspicion of the value of “full scientific certainty”; and a desire to distinguish environmental doings from allowings. In Section 2, I argue (...)
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  • Education and the Rationale of Cost–Benefit Analysis.Tal Gilead - 2014 - British Journal of Educational Studies 62 (4):373-391.
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  • A Place for Cost-Benefit Analysis.David Schmidtz - 2001 - Philosophical Issues 11 (1):148-171.
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  • A Place for Cost-Benefit Analysis.David Schmidtz - 2001 - Noûs 35 (s1):148 - 171.
    What next? We are forever making decisions. Typically, when unsure, we try to identify, then compare, our options. We weigh pros and cons. Occasionally, we make the weighing explicit, listing pros and cons and assigning numerical weights. What could be wrong with that? In fact, things sometimes go terribly wrong. This paper considers what cost-benefit analysis can do, and also what it cannot.
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  • Efficiency, Responsibility and Disability.Stephen John - 2015 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 14 (1):3-22.
    Pre-natal-diagnosis technologies allow parents to discover whether their child is likely to suffer from serious disability. One argument for state funding of access to such technologies is that doing so would be “cost-effective”, in the sense that the expected financial costs of such a programme would be outweighed by expected “benefits”, stemming from the births of fewer children with serious disabilities. This argument is extremely controversial. This paper argues that the argument may not be as unacceptable as is often assumed. (...)
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