Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Values for Victims and Vectors of Disease.Elsa Kugelberg - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (9):641-642.
    John and Curran have convincingly shown that Scanlonian contractualism is a valuable resource for evaluating pandemic response policies, and that we should reject cost–benefit analysis in favour of a contractualist framework. However, they fail to consider the part of contractualism that Scanlon constructed precisely to deal with the question of when the state can restrict individuals from making choices that are harmful to themselves and others: the value of choice view. In doing so, they leave it open for opponents of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Non-Pharmaceutical Interventions and Social Distancing as Intersubjective Care and Collective Protection.Corrado Piroddi - 2022 - Asian Bioethics Review 14 (4):379-395.
    The paper discusses non-pharmaceutical interventions as a collective form of protection that, in terms of health justice, benefits groups at risk, allowing them to engage in social life and activities during health crises. More specifically, the paper asserts that NPIs that realize social distancing are justifiable insofar as they are constitutive of a type of social protection that allows everyone, especially social disadvantaged agents, to access the public health sphere and other fundamental social spheres, such as the family and civil (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Concise Argument: Impact and Pandemic Reasonableness.John McMillan - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (9):577-578.
    The editors of the JME are grateful to its authors, reviewers and readers for their efforts and attention to the important and novel ethical challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic. These efforts meant that the journal published a number of high quality articles analysing these issues and it has shaped subsequent discussions and debate in exactly the way that we strive for. Ultimately, outcomes such as impact, readership and contributing to knowledge are what matters most for a journal, but the imperfect (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Responsibility for Reality: Social Norms and the Value of Constrained Choice.Elsa Kugelberg - 2021 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 20 (4):357-384.
    How do social norms influence our choices? And does the presence of biased norms affect what we owe to each other? Looking at empirical research relating to PrEP rollout in HIV prevention policy, a...
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Public Justification and Expert Disagreement Over Non-Pharmaceutical Interventions for the COVID-19 Pandemic.Marcus Dahlquist & Henrik D. Kugelberg - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    A wide range of non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) have been introduced to stop or slow down the COVID-19 pandemic. Examples include school closures, environmental cleaning and disinfection, mask mandates, restrictions on freedom of assembly and lockdowns. These NPIs depend on coercion for their effectiveness, either directly or indirectly. A widely held view is that coercive policies need to be publicly justified—justified to each citizen—to be legitimate. Standardly, this is thought to entail that there is a scientific consensus on the factual propositions (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Must We Vaccinate the Most Vulnerable? Efficiency, Priority, and Equality in the Distribution of Vaccines.Emma J. Curran & Stephen D. John - 2022 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 39 (4):682-697.
    In this article, we aim to map out the complexities which characterise debates about the ethics of vaccine distribution, particularly those surrounding the distribution of the COVID-19 vaccine. In doing so, we distinguish three general principles which might be used to distribute goods and two ambiguities in how one might wish to spell them out. We then argue that we can understand actual debates around the COVID-19 vaccine – including those over prioritising vaccinating the most vulnerable – as reflecting disagreements (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Ethics of Pandemics: An Introduction.Iwao Hirose - 2023 - New York, NY: Routledge.
    The recent Covid-19 pandemic has brought a broad range of ethical problems to the forefront, raising fundamental questions about the role of government in response to such outbreaks, the scarcity and allocation of health care resources, the unequal distribution of health risks and economic impacts, and the extent to which individual freedom can be restricted. In this clear introduction to the topic Iwao Hirose explores these ethical questions and analyzes the central issues in the ethics of pandemic response and preparedness (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • When is Lockdown Justified?Lucie White, Philippe van Basshuysen & Mathias Frisch - 2022 - Philosophy of Medicine 3 (1):1-22.
    How could the initial, drastic decisions to implement “lockdowns” to control the spread of COVID-19 infections be justifiable, when they were made on the basis of such uncertain evidence? We defend the imposition of lockdowns in some countries by first, and focusing on the UK, looking at the evidence that undergirded the decision, second, arguing that this provided us with sufficient grounds to restrict liberty given the circumstances, and third, defending the use of poorly-empirically-constrained epidemiological models as tools that can (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Guiding Covid Policy: Cost-Benefit Analysis and Beyond.Jonathan Aldred - forthcoming - Cambridge Journal of Economics.
    Cost-benefit analysis (CBA) is inappropriate as an aid to Covid policy-making because the plural, incommensurable values at stake are not all amenable to monetary measurement. CBA for Covid policy is also undermined by pervasive uncertainty and ignorance, and has some troubling distributional implications. However, non-consequentialist alternatives to CBA tend towards implausibly absolutist prohibitions on risk imposition. Arguments for setting aside consequentialism for special circumstances (the precautionary principle, or a medical rule of rescue) are also problematic when applied to Covid policy. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark