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Deductively-inductively

Informal Logic 3 (1):4-5 (1980)

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  1. A Defense of Conduction: A Reply to Adler.J. Anthony Blair - 2016 - Argumentation 30 (2):109-128.
    In Jonathan Adler argued that conductive arguments, as they are commonly characterized, are impossible—that no such argument can exist. This striking contention threatens to undermine a topic of argumentation theory originated by Trudy Govier based on Carl Wellman and revisited by the papers in “Conductive argument, An overlooked type of defeasible reasoning”. I here argue that Adler’s dismissal of conductive arguments relies on a misreading of the term ‘non-conclusive’ used in the characterization of this type of reasoning and argument, and (...)
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  • An Informal Logic Bibliography.Hans V. Hansen - 1990 - Informal Logic 12 (3).
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  • The “Logic” of Informal Logic.J. Anthony Blair - unknown
    Are there any logical norms for argument evaluation besides soundness and inductive strength? The paper will look at several concepts or models introduced over the years, including those of Wisdom, Toulmin, Wellman, Rescher, defeasible reasoning proponents and Walton to consider whether there is common ground among them that supplies an alternative to deductive validity and inductive strength.
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  • The Nature of Critical Thinking.Harry Reeder - 1984 - Informal Logic 6 (2).
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  • Analogical Arguings and Explainings.Fred Johnson - 1989 - Informal Logic 11 (3).
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  • The Deductive/Inductive Distinction.George Bowles - 1994 - Informal Logic 16 (3).
    In this paper I examine five distinctions between deductive and inductive arguments, concluding that the best of the five defines a deductive argument as one in which conclusive favorable relevance to its conclusion is attributed to its premises, and an inductive argument as any argument that is not deductive. This distinction, unlike its rivals, is both exclusive and exhaustive; permits both good and bad arguments of each kind; and is both useful and needed in evaluating at least some arguments.
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  • Logical Form, Probability Interpretations, and the Inductive/Deductive Distinction.James B. Freeman - 1983 - Informal Logic 5 (2).
    Logical Form, Probability Interpretations, and the Inductive/Deductive Distinction.
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  • Piagetian Insights and Critical Thinking.A. J. A. Binker & Marla Charbonneau - 1983 - Informal Logic 5 (2).
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  • Arguings and Arguments.Fred Johnson - 1984 - Informal Logic 6 (2):26-27.
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