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  1. Introduction: a Structural and Historical Approach to Understanding Advancements in Evolutionary Theory.Andrew M. Winters - 2018 - Biosemiotics 11 (2):167-180.
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  • Comprehending the Semiosis of Evolution.Alexei Sharov, Timo Maran & Morten Tønnessen - 2016 - Biosemiotics 9 (1):1-6.
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  • Macroevolutionary Freezing and the Janusian Nature of Evolvability: Is the Evolution (of Profound Biological Novelty) Going to End?Jan Toman & Jaroslav Flegr - 2018 - Biosemiotics 11 (2):263-285.
    In a macroevolutionary timescale, evolvability itself evolves. Lineages are sorted based on their ability to generate adaptive novelties, which leads to the optimization of their genotype-phenotype map. The system of translation of genetic or epigenetic changes to the phenotype may reach significant horizontal and vertical complexity, and may even exhibit certain aspects of learning behaviour. This continuously evolving semiotic system probably enables the origin of complex yet functional and internally compatible adaptations. However, it also has a second, “darker”, side. As (...)
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  • Promoting Curiosity?Markus Lindholm - 2018 - Science & Education 27 (9-10):987-1002.
    Curiosity is a wonder of the human mind. It goes to the heart of modernity, as a driving force for learning, novel insights, and innovation, both for individuals and communities. In societies dependent on science and development, finding out what promotes or hampers curiosity and wonder in school curricula and science education is accordingly essential. In this conceptual article, I suggest a framework for curiosity-based science education and I explore options for its wellbeing and development during preschool, preadolescence, and adolescence. (...)
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  • Recurrences and Human Agential Meaning Grounding: Laying a Path in Walking.Sergio Rodríguez - 2016 - Biosemiotics 9 (2):169-184.
    This article addresses the semiotic problem of how meaning is agentially grounded: how actual meaning is possible and is justifiably supported by agents’ capabilities and purposes. This article is particularly focused on human agential grounding; however, to a great degree, insights presented here can be extended to other living beings. Specifically, agential meaning is examined here inside the framework of agentive semiotics and embodied, situated and enactive cognition theories, in line with the mind-life continuity general thesis. To offer clarity and (...)
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  • A Biosemiotic Encyclopedia: an Encyclopedic Model for Evolution.Ľudmila Lacková - 2018 - Biosemiotics 11 (2):307-322.
    New discoveries in the life sciences have affirmed that the virtual script as well as its context-dependent reading and interpretation determine the final living creature. An extended understanding of Darwinian Theory is crucial for understanding life as semiosis in terms of Peirce and Eco’s semiotic models. The semiosis of living systems is potentially unlimited. Genes are not static and unchangeable scripts, but can always be reinterpreted by new interpretants that illuminate them from different points of view, depending on which properties (...)
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  • Natural selection according to Darwin: cause or effect?Ben Bradley - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (2):1-26.
    In the 1940s, the ‘modern synthesis’ (MS) of Darwinism and genetics cast genetic mutation and recombination as the source of variability from which environmental events naturally select the fittest, such ‘natural selection’ constituting the cause of evolution. Recent biology increasingly challenges this view by casting genes as followers and awarding the leading role in the genesis of adaptations to the agency and plasticity of developing phenotypes—making natural selection a consequence of other causal processes. Both views of natural selection claim to (...)
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